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Urinary Incontinence in Older Adults

Urinary Incontinence in Older Adults Chapter 2 KATHLEEN A. McCORMICK OFFICE OF THE FORUM FOR QUALJTY AND EFFECTIVENl!SS IN HEAL TH CARE AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE Poucv AND RESEARCH MARY H. P ALMER NATIONAL ] NSTITUTES OF HEALTH NATIONAL lNST11VfE ON AGING CONTENTS Incidence and Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence Assessment of Incontinence Antecedents of Incontinence Measures of Severity of Incontinence Consequences of Urinary Incontinence Treatments for lncontinence Outpatient Setting B iofeedback Long-Term Care Setting Environmental Modifications Equipment and Appliances Implications for Nursing Research It is estimated that approximately 10 million Americans are incontinent of urine, and the costs of managing incontinence are about $10 billion annually (Hu, 1990). Although the exact mechanism of the development of urinary incontinence is not completely understood, several types of incontinence have been identified. The International Continence Society establ ished a standard­ ized definition for urinary incontinence: " ... a condition in which involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable" (International Continence Society, 1988, p. 17). Additionally, four types of 26 RESEARCH ON NURSING PRACTTCE urinary incontinence were defined by the International Continence Society. These include stress incontinence, "involuntary loss of urine occurring when, in the absence of a detrusor contraction, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Nursing Research Springer Publishing

Urinary Incontinence in Older Adults

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0739-6686
eISSN
1944-4028
DOI
10.1891/0739-6686.10.1.25
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 2 KATHLEEN A. McCORMICK OFFICE OF THE FORUM FOR QUALJTY AND EFFECTIVENl!SS IN HEAL TH CARE AGENCY FOR HEALTH CARE Poucv AND RESEARCH MARY H. P ALMER NATIONAL ] NSTITUTES OF HEALTH NATIONAL lNST11VfE ON AGING CONTENTS Incidence and Prevalence of Urinary Incontinence Assessment of Incontinence Antecedents of Incontinence Measures of Severity of Incontinence Consequences of Urinary Incontinence Treatments for lncontinence Outpatient Setting B iofeedback Long-Term Care Setting Environmental Modifications Equipment and Appliances Implications for Nursing Research It is estimated that approximately 10 million Americans are incontinent of urine, and the costs of managing incontinence are about $10 billion annually (Hu, 1990). Although the exact mechanism of the development of urinary incontinence is not completely understood, several types of incontinence have been identified. The International Continence Society establ ished a standard­ ized definition for urinary incontinence: " ... a condition in which involuntary loss of urine is a social or hygienic problem and is objectively demonstrable" (International Continence Society, 1988, p. 17). Additionally, four types of 26 RESEARCH ON NURSING PRACTTCE urinary incontinence were defined by the International Continence Society. These include stress incontinence, "involuntary loss of urine occurring when, in the absence of a detrusor contraction, the

Journal

Annual Review of Nursing ResearchSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1992

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