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Relaxation

Relaxation Chapter 5 MARIAH SNYDER SCHOOL OF NURSING UNlVERSITY OF MlNNESGrA CONTENTS Definitions of Relaxation Therapies 112 Outcome Measures 113 Comfort 113 Improved Physiological Status liS Improved Psych%gical Status 116 Improved Psychological and Physiological Status 119 Discussion and Directions for Nursing Research 122 Relaxation interventions have been used extensively during the past 25 years for reducing anxiety. treating symptoms associated with specific health problems, and promoting increased well~being. Numerous in­ terventions are categorized as relaxation therapies: progressive muscle relaxation, passive muscle relaxation, autogenic therapy. imagery, self­ hypnosis, breathing techniques, and yoga (Davis, McKay, & Eshel­ man, 1980; Rice, Caldwell, Butler, & Robinson, 1986; Smith, 1985; Woolfolk & Lehrer, 1984). Several factors have contributed to the increased use of relaxation interventions. In the 1960s investigators discovered that functions un­ der the control of the autonomic nervous system such as heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing could be altered by intentional actions or thoughts. Researchers demonstrated that functions previously 111 J 12 RESEARCH ON NURSING PRACTICE thought to be regulated automatically by the autonomic nervous sys­ tem could be brought under volitional control through reinforcement of these functions. During this same time period techniques that were part of Eastern cultures were introduced http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Nursing Research Springer Publishing

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0739-6686
eISSN
1944-4028
DOI
10.1891/0739-6686.6.1.111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 5 MARIAH SNYDER SCHOOL OF NURSING UNlVERSITY OF MlNNESGrA CONTENTS Definitions of Relaxation Therapies 112 Outcome Measures 113 Comfort 113 Improved Physiological Status liS Improved Psych%gical Status 116 Improved Psychological and Physiological Status 119 Discussion and Directions for Nursing Research 122 Relaxation interventions have been used extensively during the past 25 years for reducing anxiety. treating symptoms associated with specific health problems, and promoting increased well~being. Numerous in­ terventions are categorized as relaxation therapies: progressive muscle relaxation, passive muscle relaxation, autogenic therapy. imagery, self­ hypnosis, breathing techniques, and yoga (Davis, McKay, & Eshel­ man, 1980; Rice, Caldwell, Butler, & Robinson, 1986; Smith, 1985; Woolfolk & Lehrer, 1984). Several factors have contributed to the increased use of relaxation interventions. In the 1960s investigators discovered that functions un­ der the control of the autonomic nervous system such as heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing could be altered by intentional actions or thoughts. Researchers demonstrated that functions previously 111 J 12 RESEARCH ON NURSING PRACTICE thought to be regulated automatically by the autonomic nervous sys­ tem could be brought under volitional control through reinforcement of these functions. During this same time period techniques that were part of Eastern cultures were introduced

Journal

Annual Review of Nursing ResearchSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1988

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