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Men in Nursing

Men in Nursing Chapter 9 LUTHER P. CmusTMAN COLLEOE OF NURSlNO RUSH UNIVERSITY CONTENTS Historical Overview 194 Survey Research 195 Focused Interview 198 Use of Standardized lest Batteries 199 Summary and Directions for Future Research 202 Professional nurses, along with a few other professionals such as occupational therapists and dietitians, are imbedded in strongly sex­ segregated professions. Men constitute 3.3070 ofthe nursing profession (Division of Nursing, United States Department of Health and Hu­ man Services, 1984) even after over 20 years of affirmative action and dramatic changes in the gender composition of most of the profes­ sions. Research is necessary to ascertain if nurses have adopted an attitude of passive resistance to the democratization of membership within their ranks, whether there exists a variety of structural variables that impedes the attainment of a more sociaJly representative profes­ sion. or whether complex forces external to the profession serve to maintain the present status of men and minorities in nursing. Certain­ ly, the fact that professional nurses are 9OOJo white female so long after the civil rights legislation of 1964 and the President's Executive Order of 1965 raises questions that merit investigation. In a society that is growing rapidly in greater complexity. the investigation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Nursing Research Springer Publishing

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0739-6686
eISSN
1944-4028
DOI
10.1891/0739-6686.6.1.193
Publisher site
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Abstract

Chapter 9 LUTHER P. CmusTMAN COLLEOE OF NURSlNO RUSH UNIVERSITY CONTENTS Historical Overview 194 Survey Research 195 Focused Interview 198 Use of Standardized lest Batteries 199 Summary and Directions for Future Research 202 Professional nurses, along with a few other professionals such as occupational therapists and dietitians, are imbedded in strongly sex­ segregated professions. Men constitute 3.3070 ofthe nursing profession (Division of Nursing, United States Department of Health and Hu­ man Services, 1984) even after over 20 years of affirmative action and dramatic changes in the gender composition of most of the profes­ sions. Research is necessary to ascertain if nurses have adopted an attitude of passive resistance to the democratization of membership within their ranks, whether there exists a variety of structural variables that impedes the attainment of a more sociaJly representative profes­ sion. or whether complex forces external to the profession serve to maintain the present status of men and minorities in nursing. Certain­ ly, the fact that professional nurses are 9OOJo white female so long after the civil rights legislation of 1964 and the President's Executive Order of 1965 raises questions that merit investigation. In a society that is growing rapidly in greater complexity. the investigation

Journal

Annual Review of Nursing ResearchSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 1988

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