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Interventions for Persons with Irreversible Dementia

Interventions for Persons with Irreversible Dementia This chapter provides an overview and critique of the theoretical and research literature by nurse researchers and researchers in other disciplines regarding interventions for persons with dementia (PWD). Reports were included if published in English between 1990 and 2000 and if a descriptive, correlational, longitudinal, or intervention design was used. Case studies and narrative descriptions were not included. No specific age criteria for study participants were applied; however, PWD are generally over age 55. The theoretical literature and various disease stages were reviewed, including clinical and behavioral indicators for disease progression. Using a variety of approaches to survey the extant literature (review of computer databases, contacts with experts in the field, ancestry method, and manual searches of key gerontology journals), over 1,200 citations were initially reviewed, allowing for approximately 375 publications undergoing thorough analysis with 157 research publications being included in this synthesis. Key findings include the identification of well-supported cognitive-behavioral interventions to enhance cognitive functioning and memory, and to relieve depression in the early disease stages; multiple environmental and behavioral approaches for improvement in functioning, maintenance of activities, and alleviation of behavioral symptoms in the middle disease stages; and behavioral, interactive, and staff support and education interventions for adequate nutritional intake, urinary incontinence, and management of problematic vocalizations and other behavioral symptoms in the later disease stages. Recommendations for future studies include the need for development of operational definitions of behavioral symptoms, inclusion of the perspective of PWD, evaluation of long-term outcomes, adequate sample size, community rather than institutional-based studies, and increased intervention testing at various stages of the disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Nursing Research Springer Publishing

Interventions for Persons with Irreversible Dementia

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2021 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
0739-6686
eISSN
1944-4028
DOI
10.1891/0739-6686.20.1.89
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview and critique of the theoretical and research literature by nurse researchers and researchers in other disciplines regarding interventions for persons with dementia (PWD). Reports were included if published in English between 1990 and 2000 and if a descriptive, correlational, longitudinal, or intervention design was used. Case studies and narrative descriptions were not included. No specific age criteria for study participants were applied; however, PWD are generally over age 55. The theoretical literature and various disease stages were reviewed, including clinical and behavioral indicators for disease progression. Using a variety of approaches to survey the extant literature (review of computer databases, contacts with experts in the field, ancestry method, and manual searches of key gerontology journals), over 1,200 citations were initially reviewed, allowing for approximately 375 publications undergoing thorough analysis with 157 research publications being included in this synthesis. Key findings include the identification of well-supported cognitive-behavioral interventions to enhance cognitive functioning and memory, and to relieve depression in the early disease stages; multiple environmental and behavioral approaches for improvement in functioning, maintenance of activities, and alleviation of behavioral symptoms in the middle disease stages; and behavioral, interactive, and staff support and education interventions for adequate nutritional intake, urinary incontinence, and management of problematic vocalizations and other behavioral symptoms in the later disease stages. Recommendations for future studies include the need for development of operational definitions of behavioral symptoms, inclusion of the perspective of PWD, evaluation of long-term outcomes, adequate sample size, community rather than institutional-based studies, and increased intervention testing at various stages of the disease.

Journal

Annual Review of Nursing ResearchSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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