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Culture and Consent in Clinical Care: A Critical Review of Nursing and Nursing Ethics Literature

Culture and Consent in Clinical Care: A Critical Review of Nursing and Nursing Ethics Literature CHAPTER 8 Culture and Consent in Clinical Care A Critical Review of Nursing and Nursing Ethics Literature Michael J. Deem and Felicia Stokes ABSTRACT The duty to obtain informed consent carries significant weight within the domi - nant normative frameworks for healthcare research and clinical care. Informed consent is seen as an important expression of a patient’s freedom of choice in healthcare decision-making. However, some clinicians and researchers have raised concerns that the implementation of a normative framework in clinical care that assigns considerable moral weight to patient autonomy and informed consent for all patients, regardless of their cultural identities and values, might be incompatible or in tension with culturally congruent care. The authors of this chapter conducted a review of 83 peer-review nursing and nursing ethics articles that focus on cultural identity and informed consent for treatment within clinical practice settings. The purpose of this review is to identify salient themes in nurses’ characterizations of the influence of cultural identity and values on clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions of informed consent in clinical contexts, as well as of elements of the consent process such as truth-telling and deci- sional authority. The authors identify and describe multiple themes running © http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Nursing Research Springer Publishing

Culture and Consent in Clinical Care: A Critical Review of Nursing and Nursing Ethics Literature

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2021 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
0739-6686
eISSN
1944-4028
DOI
10.1891/0739-6686.37.1.223
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CHAPTER 8 Culture and Consent in Clinical Care A Critical Review of Nursing and Nursing Ethics Literature Michael J. Deem and Felicia Stokes ABSTRACT The duty to obtain informed consent carries significant weight within the domi - nant normative frameworks for healthcare research and clinical care. Informed consent is seen as an important expression of a patient’s freedom of choice in healthcare decision-making. However, some clinicians and researchers have raised concerns that the implementation of a normative framework in clinical care that assigns considerable moral weight to patient autonomy and informed consent for all patients, regardless of their cultural identities and values, might be incompatible or in tension with culturally congruent care. The authors of this chapter conducted a review of 83 peer-review nursing and nursing ethics articles that focus on cultural identity and informed consent for treatment within clinical practice settings. The purpose of this review is to identify salient themes in nurses’ characterizations of the influence of cultural identity and values on clinicians’ and patients’ perceptions of informed consent in clinical contexts, as well as of elements of the consent process such as truth-telling and deci- sional authority. The authors identify and describe multiple themes running ©

Journal

Annual Review of Nursing ResearchSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 1, 2018

References