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World wide traditional cheeses: Banned for business?

World wide traditional cheeses: Banned for business? Traditional cheeses are characterized by strong links to their territory of origin and are testimonial of the history and the culture of the community that produces them. Every traditional cheese originates from a complex system which results in unique organoleptic characteristics. The development of these unique characteristics is linked to several biodiverse factors: the environment, the climate, the natural pasture, the breed of the animals, the use of raw milk and its natural microflora, the cheesemaking technology with the unique role of human beings rather than automated technology, historical tools as well as the natural aging conditions. In many countries traditional products are almost banned, even in Europe, despite Article 8 of the Directive 92/46 of the EEC, which grants derogations for the manufacture of cheese with a period of aging or ripening of at least 60 days. Issues relating to “food safety” are frequently given as a “false” argument to explain the banning of traditional products. Reviews of food safety outbreaks have demonstrated that raw-milk cheeses do not pose any greater risk than industrial cheeses made from pasteurized milk. Improper pasteurization, post-processing contamination, storage and cross-contamination are the main contributing factors that are responsible for these outbreaks. Traditional cheeses cannot be identified simply by the use of “raw milk”; there are a “multiplicity of practices” that have the potential to make safe products. The challenge for the research community is to demonstrate the role and the importance of those practices to deliver the maximum safety benefits to the consumer. Eliminating the production of traditional cheeses would make it much easier to market industrial products. However, consumers would lose the opportunity to compare the natural aroma, the health benefits, the cultural background as well as the biodiversity of traditional products. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

World wide traditional cheeses: Banned for business?

Dairy Science & Technology , Volume 90 (4) – May 21, 2011

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst/2010016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Traditional cheeses are characterized by strong links to their territory of origin and are testimonial of the history and the culture of the community that produces them. Every traditional cheese originates from a complex system which results in unique organoleptic characteristics. The development of these unique characteristics is linked to several biodiverse factors: the environment, the climate, the natural pasture, the breed of the animals, the use of raw milk and its natural microflora, the cheesemaking technology with the unique role of human beings rather than automated technology, historical tools as well as the natural aging conditions. In many countries traditional products are almost banned, even in Europe, despite Article 8 of the Directive 92/46 of the EEC, which grants derogations for the manufacture of cheese with a period of aging or ripening of at least 60 days. Issues relating to “food safety” are frequently given as a “false” argument to explain the banning of traditional products. Reviews of food safety outbreaks have demonstrated that raw-milk cheeses do not pose any greater risk than industrial cheeses made from pasteurized milk. Improper pasteurization, post-processing contamination, storage and cross-contamination are the main contributing factors that are responsible for these outbreaks. Traditional cheeses cannot be identified simply by the use of “raw milk”; there are a “multiplicity of practices” that have the potential to make safe products. The challenge for the research community is to demonstrate the role and the importance of those practices to deliver the maximum safety benefits to the consumer. Eliminating the production of traditional cheeses would make it much easier to market industrial products. However, consumers would lose the opportunity to compare the natural aroma, the health benefits, the cultural background as well as the biodiversity of traditional products.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References