Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

When logics of learning conflict: an analysis of two workplace-based continuing education programs

When logics of learning conflict: an analysis of two workplace-based continuing education programs Educators, practitioners, and policy makers are calling for stronger connections between continuing education (CE) for professionals and the concerns of workplaces where these professionals work. This call for greater alignment is not unique to the health professions. Researchers within the field of higher education have long wrestled with the complexities of aligning professional learning and workplace concerns. In this study, we extend this critical line of inquiry to explore the possible conceptual intersections between two CE programs acting within a single healthcare organization. Both programs are concerned with improving patient care, primarily by changing the ways professionals think and talk with one another. However, the two programs have different historical origins: one in a workplace, the other within a university setting. Introducing the concept of “modes of ordering” as a way to analyze the curricula, we argue the programs are operating through separate logics of learning. We label these two modes of ordering: (1) learning as standardization and (2) learning as identification. Through our discussion, we explore how these different modes demand different roles for educators and participants. Ultimately, we argue that both have value. However, we also argue that educators require conceptual tools to sensitize them to the possibility of competing logics of learning and the subsequent implications for their practice as educators. In conclusion, we offer the metaphor of CE educator as choreographer, connecting concepts and practices within these logics in productive ways while continually navigating the various learning imperatives acting on professionals at any given time. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Health Sciences Education Springer Journals

When logics of learning conflict: an analysis of two workplace-based continuing education programs

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/when-logics-of-learning-conflict-an-analysis-of-two-workplace-based-ypcVP3B08l
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature B.V. 2020
Subject
Education; Medical Education
ISSN
1382-4996
eISSN
1573-1677
DOI
10.1007/s10459-019-09952-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Educators, practitioners, and policy makers are calling for stronger connections between continuing education (CE) for professionals and the concerns of workplaces where these professionals work. This call for greater alignment is not unique to the health professions. Researchers within the field of higher education have long wrestled with the complexities of aligning professional learning and workplace concerns. In this study, we extend this critical line of inquiry to explore the possible conceptual intersections between two CE programs acting within a single healthcare organization. Both programs are concerned with improving patient care, primarily by changing the ways professionals think and talk with one another. However, the two programs have different historical origins: one in a workplace, the other within a university setting. Introducing the concept of “modes of ordering” as a way to analyze the curricula, we argue the programs are operating through separate logics of learning. We label these two modes of ordering: (1) learning as standardization and (2) learning as identification. Through our discussion, we explore how these different modes demand different roles for educators and participants. Ultimately, we argue that both have value. However, we also argue that educators require conceptual tools to sensitize them to the possibility of competing logics of learning and the subsequent implications for their practice as educators. In conclusion, we offer the metaphor of CE educator as choreographer, connecting concepts and practices within these logics in productive ways while continually navigating the various learning imperatives acting on professionals at any given time.

Journal

Advances in Health Sciences EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 2, 2020

References