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What Do Children Need to Flourish?School Engagement

What Do Children Need to Flourish?: School Engagement Jennifer A. Fredricks Connecticut College Phyllis Blumenfeld and Jeanne Friedel University of Michigan Alison Paris Clavemont McKenna College There is a growing interest in the construct of school engagement. One reason for the interest in engagement is that it is seen as an antidote to low achieve- ment, high levels of student boredom and disaffection, and the high dropout rates in urban areas. Another reason is that engagement is presumed to be mal- leable and responsive to variations in the environment. In our review of the literature, we found three types of engagement: Behavioval engagement draws on the idea of participation, including involvement in academic, social, or ex- tracurricular activities; it is considered crucial for achieving positive academic outcomes and preventing dropping out (Connell, 1990; Finn, 1989). Emotional engagement draws on the idea of appeal. It includes positive and negative re- actions to teachers, classmates, academics, or school and is presumed to create ties to the institution and influence willingness to do the work (Connell, 1990; Finn, 1989). Finally, cognitive engagement draws on the idea of investment; it incorporates being thoughtful and being willing to exert the necessary effort for comprehension of complex ideas and mastery of difficult skills http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

What Do Children Need to Flourish?School Engagement

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
© Springer Science+Business Media 2005
ISBN
978-0-387-23061-0
Pages
305 –321
DOI
10.1007/0-387-23823-9_19
Publisher site
See Chapter on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jennifer A. Fredricks Connecticut College Phyllis Blumenfeld and Jeanne Friedel University of Michigan Alison Paris Clavemont McKenna College There is a growing interest in the construct of school engagement. One reason for the interest in engagement is that it is seen as an antidote to low achieve- ment, high levels of student boredom and disaffection, and the high dropout rates in urban areas. Another reason is that engagement is presumed to be mal- leable and responsive to variations in the environment. In our review of the literature, we found three types of engagement: Behavioval engagement draws on the idea of participation, including involvement in academic, social, or ex- tracurricular activities; it is considered crucial for achieving positive academic outcomes and preventing dropping out (Connell, 1990; Finn, 1989). Emotional engagement draws on the idea of appeal. It includes positive and negative re- actions to teachers, classmates, academics, or school and is presumed to create ties to the institution and influence willingness to do the work (Connell, 1990; Finn, 1989). Finally, cognitive engagement draws on the idea of investment; it incorporates being thoughtful and being willing to exert the necessary effort for comprehension of complex ideas and mastery of difficult skills

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: Teacher Support; School Engagement; Cognitive Engagement; Classroom Context; Emotional Engagement

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