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Visions of the self

Visions of the self The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 55, No. 4, 1995 Edited by Althea J. Homer, Ph.D. THE MYTH OF THE INVULNERABLE SELF OF ADOLESCENCE Naomi Rucker and Valinda Greene Contemporary psychoanalysis is turning avid attention to the intercon- nections between culture and psyche. In moving away from the locus of the individual, psychoanalytic theorists are beginning to unravel the cul- tural constructions of psychoanalytic theory. The relationship of psycho- analysis to science, particularly to the culture of scientific positivism, has become a tense debate (Haynal, 1993; Robinson, 1993), while the cultural biases embodied by psychoanalytic theories (e.g., Roland, 1989), and the notion that psychoanalytic constructs can be viewed as metaphors for so- ciocultural conditions (Lombardi, 1994), are opening up as areas of explo- ration. The notion of "self" is becoming a notion of "self-in-context." Classical psychoanalysis views culture as an extension of intrapsychic dynamics and sees the origins of social construction as residing in intra- psychic conflict. Neo-Freudian models, which accentuate sociocultural factors, conceive of the relationship between the sociocultural and the en- vironmental as parallel or as organized around adaptation. Relational the- ory has focused on human relatedness, paying limited attention to human- kind's relatedness with the other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1995 Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF02741985
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 55, No. 4, 1995 Edited by Althea J. Homer, Ph.D. THE MYTH OF THE INVULNERABLE SELF OF ADOLESCENCE Naomi Rucker and Valinda Greene Contemporary psychoanalysis is turning avid attention to the intercon- nections between culture and psyche. In moving away from the locus of the individual, psychoanalytic theorists are beginning to unravel the cul- tural constructions of psychoanalytic theory. The relationship of psycho- analysis to science, particularly to the culture of scientific positivism, has become a tense debate (Haynal, 1993; Robinson, 1993), while the cultural biases embodied by psychoanalytic theories (e.g., Roland, 1989), and the notion that psychoanalytic constructs can be viewed as metaphors for so- ciocultural conditions (Lombardi, 1994), are opening up as areas of explo- ration. The notion of "self" is becoming a notion of "self-in-context." Classical psychoanalysis views culture as an extension of intrapsychic dynamics and sees the origins of social construction as residing in intra- psychic conflict. Neo-Freudian models, which accentuate sociocultural factors, conceive of the relationship between the sociocultural and the en- vironmental as parallel or as organized around adaptation. Relational the- ory has focused on human relatedness, paying limited attention to human- kind's relatedness with the other

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 1995

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

References