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Utilization of riverbed silt and subsoil of Gopalganj for masonry bricks incorporating internal fuel and comparison of their construction properties with commercial bricks

Utilization of riverbed silt and subsoil of Gopalganj for masonry bricks incorporating internal... Agricultural topsoil is the most common raw material for making clay bricks in Bangladesh because of its abundance and prehistoric tradition. This practice of the bygone age is steadily pushing the environment toward the risk of fertile soil depletion. At the same time, the largest delta of this world gathers tons of sediment during the monsoon while bearing the havocs of floods due to the loss of navigability of the rivers. It propels the government to expend more on dredging. According to soil science, particle size is the only difference between clay and silt. Thus, bricks can be thought to be made from the Himalayan silt along with agricultural subsoil. However, this replacement will bring some adverse effects on the construction properties which need to be assessed. Along with the depletion of fertile topsoil, the brick sector exaggerates the environment by emitting fine particles from coal-burning during vitrification. This hazard can be lessened by incorporating internal fuel. In this work, we represent a method to produce masonry bricks by substituting the topsoil completely with riverbed silt and subsoil. The novel feature is a comparison of those silty bricks with commercial bricks available in the market to perceive the real difference in construction properties. Principally, the study presents a realistic evaluation of silt-made bricks as a building material insinuating the potential of a sustainable source of raw material for masonry bricks. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Innovative Infrastructure Solutions Springer Journals

Utilization of riverbed silt and subsoil of Gopalganj for masonry bricks incorporating internal fuel and comparison of their construction properties with commercial bricks

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022
ISSN
2364-4176
eISSN
2364-4184
DOI
10.1007/s41062-022-00745-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Agricultural topsoil is the most common raw material for making clay bricks in Bangladesh because of its abundance and prehistoric tradition. This practice of the bygone age is steadily pushing the environment toward the risk of fertile soil depletion. At the same time, the largest delta of this world gathers tons of sediment during the monsoon while bearing the havocs of floods due to the loss of navigability of the rivers. It propels the government to expend more on dredging. According to soil science, particle size is the only difference between clay and silt. Thus, bricks can be thought to be made from the Himalayan silt along with agricultural subsoil. However, this replacement will bring some adverse effects on the construction properties which need to be assessed. Along with the depletion of fertile topsoil, the brick sector exaggerates the environment by emitting fine particles from coal-burning during vitrification. This hazard can be lessened by incorporating internal fuel. In this work, we represent a method to produce masonry bricks by substituting the topsoil completely with riverbed silt and subsoil. The novel feature is a comparison of those silty bricks with commercial bricks available in the market to perceive the real difference in construction properties. Principally, the study presents a realistic evaluation of silt-made bricks as a building material insinuating the potential of a sustainable source of raw material for masonry bricks.

Journal

Innovative Infrastructure SolutionsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 1, 2022

Keywords: Clay bricks; Agricultural topsoil; Riverbed silt; Compressive strength; Water absorption; Internal fuel

References