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Use of dairy and non-dairy Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus strains as adjuncts in cheddar cheese

Use of dairy and non-dairy Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus... Lactobacilli have been used as adjunct cultures in the manufacture of different cheeses with the objective of accelerating ripening and/or improving cheese quality, but no studies have been conducted with strains from non-dairy origins. A miniature cheddar-type cheese model was used to screen ten dairy and non-dairy Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus strains for their performances as adjuncts in cheese manufacture. All strains were able to grow and survive in the cheese environment and produced only minor, although statistically significant, changes in gross cheese composition. Adjuncts affected secondary proteolysis causing differences in the levels of free amino groups, total free amino acids and reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) profiles of pH 4.6-soluble extract. Three strains were selected on the basis of differences in proteolysis pattern and used in a pilot-plant production of cheddar cheese, which was ripened for 180 days. The results confirmed that use of L. plantarum adjuncts significantly affected secondary proteolysis as measured by free amino acid production with minor impact on gross composition and primary starter performance, but the impact on RP-HPLC profiles of pH 4.6-soluble extracts was not statistically significant. The use of a strain originally isolated from olive brine fermentation, L. plantarum P1.5, resulted in significantly improved preference scores over the control. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Use of dairy and non-dairy Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus strains as adjuncts in cheddar cheese

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by INRA and Springer-Verlag France
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1007/s13594-013-0131-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lactobacilli have been used as adjunct cultures in the manufacture of different cheeses with the objective of accelerating ripening and/or improving cheese quality, but no studies have been conducted with strains from non-dairy origins. A miniature cheddar-type cheese model was used to screen ten dairy and non-dairy Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus paraplantarum and Lactobacillus pentosus strains for their performances as adjuncts in cheese manufacture. All strains were able to grow and survive in the cheese environment and produced only minor, although statistically significant, changes in gross cheese composition. Adjuncts affected secondary proteolysis causing differences in the levels of free amino groups, total free amino acids and reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) profiles of pH 4.6-soluble extract. Three strains were selected on the basis of differences in proteolysis pattern and used in a pilot-plant production of cheddar cheese, which was ripened for 180 days. The results confirmed that use of L. plantarum adjuncts significantly affected secondary proteolysis as measured by free amino acid production with minor impact on gross composition and primary starter performance, but the impact on RP-HPLC profiles of pH 4.6-soluble extracts was not statistically significant. The use of a strain originally isolated from olive brine fermentation, L. plantarum P1.5, resulted in significantly improved preference scores over the control.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 17, 2013

References