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Understanding Cancer Screening Intention Among Physically Active Adults Ages 18–49

Understanding Cancer Screening Intention Among Physically Active Adults Ages 18–49 Ideal efforts for cancer prevention would include lifestyle modifications along with routine, age-eligible cancer screening. Employing an asset-based approach within vulnerable populations already engaging in at least one healthy behavior (i.e., physical activity) may be an ideal way to further reduce cancer risk across peer groups with low cancer screening rates. Guided by the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the aim of this study was to identify constructs associated with cancer screening intentions among young to middle aged adults for influencing educational and behavioral interventions designed to promote cancer prevention. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was utilized to assess attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to screen for cancer among physically active adults aged 18–49 years. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to characterize the sample, and hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the influence of sociodemographic variables and TPB constructs on cancer screening intentions. Age, female sex, reporting a routine doctor’s visit, reported knowledge of physical activity as a lifestyle behavior to reduce cancer risk, and an increased number of motivating factors for engaging in physical activity were significantly associated with higher cancer screening intention (P < 0.001). With the addition of TPB constructs (i.e., subjective norms and perceived behavioral control), the final analytic model accounted for 31% of the variance in intention to screen for cancer. Findings suggest that the TPB could be used to tailor or design asset-based, cancer education interventions to effectively promote age-eligible cancer screenings among physically active adults. Educational content to increase social support for cancer screening and enhance perceived behavioral control to complete screening is essential in this population. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cancer Education Springer Journals

Understanding Cancer Screening Intention Among Physically Active Adults Ages 18–49

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) under exclusive licence to American Association for Cancer Education 2022
ISSN
0885-8195
eISSN
1543-0154
DOI
10.1007/s13187-022-02142-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ideal efforts for cancer prevention would include lifestyle modifications along with routine, age-eligible cancer screening. Employing an asset-based approach within vulnerable populations already engaging in at least one healthy behavior (i.e., physical activity) may be an ideal way to further reduce cancer risk across peer groups with low cancer screening rates. Guided by the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the aim of this study was to identify constructs associated with cancer screening intentions among young to middle aged adults for influencing educational and behavioral interventions designed to promote cancer prevention. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was utilized to assess attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to screen for cancer among physically active adults aged 18–49 years. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to characterize the sample, and hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to assess the influence of sociodemographic variables and TPB constructs on cancer screening intentions. Age, female sex, reporting a routine doctor’s visit, reported knowledge of physical activity as a lifestyle behavior to reduce cancer risk, and an increased number of motivating factors for engaging in physical activity were significantly associated with higher cancer screening intention (P < 0.001). With the addition of TPB constructs (i.e., subjective norms and perceived behavioral control), the final analytic model accounted for 31% of the variance in intention to screen for cancer. Findings suggest that the TPB could be used to tailor or design asset-based, cancer education interventions to effectively promote age-eligible cancer screenings among physically active adults. Educational content to increase social support for cancer screening and enhance perceived behavioral control to complete screening is essential in this population.

Journal

Journal of Cancer EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 3, 2022

Keywords: Physical activity; Cancer screening intention; Young and middle-aged adults; Perceived behavioral control; Attitudes; Social norms

References