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Uncertain reasoning about agents' beliefs and reasoning

Uncertain reasoning about agents' beliefs and reasoning Reasoning about mental states and processes is important in varioussubareas of the legal domain. A trial lawyer might need to reason andthe beliefs, reasoning and other mental states and processes of membersof a jury; a police officer might need to reason about the conjecturedbeliefs and reasoning of perpetrators; a judge may need to consider adefendant's mental states and processes for the purposes of sentencing;and so on. Further, the mental states in question may themselves beabout the mental states and processes of other people. Therefore, if AIsystems are to assist with reasoning tasks in law, they may need to beable to reason about mental states and processes. Such reasoning isriddled with uncertainty, and this is true in particular in the legaldomain. The article discusses how various different types ofuncertainty arise, and shows how they greatly complicate the task ofreasoning about mental states and processes. The article concentrates onthe special case of states of belief and processes of reasoning, andsketches an implemented, prototype computer program (ATT-Meta) thatcopes with the various types of uncertainty in reasoning about beliefsand reasoning. In particular, the article outlines the system'sfacilities for handling conflict between different lines of argument,especially when these lie within the reasoning of different people. Thesystem's approach is illustrated by application to a real-life muggingexample. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Uncertain reasoning about agents' beliefs and reasoning

Artificial Intelligence and Law , Volume 9 (3) – Oct 19, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/A:1017993913369
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reasoning about mental states and processes is important in varioussubareas of the legal domain. A trial lawyer might need to reason andthe beliefs, reasoning and other mental states and processes of membersof a jury; a police officer might need to reason about the conjecturedbeliefs and reasoning of perpetrators; a judge may need to consider adefendant's mental states and processes for the purposes of sentencing;and so on. Further, the mental states in question may themselves beabout the mental states and processes of other people. Therefore, if AIsystems are to assist with reasoning tasks in law, they may need to beable to reason about mental states and processes. Such reasoning isriddled with uncertainty, and this is true in particular in the legaldomain. The article discusses how various different types ofuncertainty arise, and shows how they greatly complicate the task ofreasoning about mental states and processes. The article concentrates onthe special case of states of belief and processes of reasoning, andsketches an implemented, prototype computer program (ATT-Meta) thatcopes with the various types of uncertainty in reasoning about beliefsand reasoning. In particular, the article outlines the system'sfacilities for handling conflict between different lines of argument,especially when these lie within the reasoning of different people. Thesystem's approach is illustrated by application to a real-life muggingexample.

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 19, 2004

References