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Today's Challenge for Academic Publication

Today's Challenge for Academic Publication Logist. Res. (2009) 1:69–70 DOI 10.1007/s12159-009-0016-7 EDITORIAL Peter Klaus Published online: 1 September 2009 Springer-Verlag 2009 Dear Readers, Change in the world of academic publications is no less The primary, if not the exclusive yardstick by which dramatic than in the ‘‘real’’ world of the economy. This excellence is measured is their output in highly ranked seems to be true especially in our part of the world, the journals. applied sciences of management, engineering, economics, • Last but not least: the practice of writing dissertations operations research, and logistics—except: the direction is and habilitation research is rapidly shifting from the different! While the challenge to many ‘‘real world’’ traditional monograph-type, book-length piece of businesses and to policy and decision makers of the recent research to ‘‘cumulative’’ dissertations and habilitation years has been to cope with a precipitous decline in volumes, where three, four, or more refereed journal demand, production, and financial supplies in many publications are bound together. Some estimates that I industries, we see and foresee an equally dramatic rise in have—just from the German ‘‘demand’’ for A and B the demand for opportunities to publish academic work. journal publications—suggest that in the next few years The observations that I make in our German-language an additional 40 to 60 aspiring Ph.D. students in the and broader European academic community suggest that field of logistics and supply chain management will the pressures to ‘‘publish or perish’’ are increasing now far want to place their three or more papers in A and B beyond the levels of the past. More precisely, it is now journals per annum to substitute what used to be ‘‘publish in A- and B-ranked journals…or else!’’ for aca- monograph dissertations. And that is just Germany, demics working on their careers and reputation. accounting for less than a quarter of the European Some reasons are obvious: logistics community! • Where there are respected and accepted national What does this mean? There will be much tighter journals in their respective languages (other than competition for getting papers accepted in those journals English), these are declining in importance. Papers of that already have established good rankings. There will be whatever quality, which are published there, are rapidly longer and longer waiting periods for accepted work to be losing their value on resumes and publications lists. printed. And there is need for more outlets that can publish • The competition between universities for positions of excellent academic work and that gain A and B acceptance excellence has become as global as the competition in the rankings. between international corporations in markets in the For a new international journal like our Logistics automotive and electronics industries, and elsewhere. Research, overall, that sounds like good news. We have and will have a rising supply of submissions (and we welcome them!). But this development also poses signifi- cant challenges to us, the editors of the journal, to the P. Klaus (&) institutions that put out journal rankings, and to the broader Nurnberg, Germany academic community that supplies the judgement calls. e-mail: peter.klaus@atl.fraunhofer.de 123 70 Logist. Res. (2009) 1:69–70 We must make sure that the increased flow of manu- in recent years. Bretzke is suggesting that we may not have script submissions—more often from less experienced been critical enough. We invite your comments and criti- young researchers than in the past—does not result in cisms about his argument to start a discussion about this lowering standards of the publication. We must succeed in important issue. finding and maintaining a growing number of experienced The second paper by Halldorsson, Kotzab, and Skjoett- and dedicated reviewers to the cumbersome task of sup- Larsen addresses another of the ‘‘top’’ subjects of our time porting authors in the publication process. And we have to in a similar fashion. They ask whether the effects of supply manage the review process speedily and well. chain management’s growing acceptance are a blessing or But the institutions and peers that do the journal rank- a curse. ings must also cooperate: A traditionally multi-year pro- Obermeier’s paper is a rare study that provides and cess of noticing and evaluating new journals must become analyzes data on changes in inventory levels—as one of the more reactive to a rapidly changing and growing world of key output variables that should be positively affected by publication platforms. And the questions of what makes the growing sophistication of logistics. academic contributions to an applied, interdisciplinary And finally, Jeschonowski, Schmitz, Wallenburg, and science like Logistics ‘‘excellent’’ today—and tomorrow— Weber provide a broad and deep review of the evolution must be considered and reconsidered continuously, as the and advances in the field of controlling and control systems real world changes, which we are expected to help. in logistics. We want Logistics Research to make a contribution I hope you will enjoy and benefit from studying towards meeting these challenges, and we ask you, our Logistics Research! readers and authors, to help us do this better with every issue! The second issue, which you hold in your hands, starts with a somewhat provocative article by Bretzke on the aspirations and limitations of the concept of supply chain Peter Klaus, Editor-in-Chief management, which has been receiving so much attention August 2009. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Logistics Research Springer Journals

Today's Challenge for Academic Publication

Logistics Research , Volume 1 (2) – Sep 1, 2009

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Engineering; Engineering Economics, Organization, Logistics, Marketing; Logistics; Industrial and Production Engineering; Simulation and Modeling; Operation Research/Decision Theory
ISSN
1865-035X
eISSN
1865-0368
DOI
10.1007/s12159-009-0016-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Logist. Res. (2009) 1:69–70 DOI 10.1007/s12159-009-0016-7 EDITORIAL Peter Klaus Published online: 1 September 2009 Springer-Verlag 2009 Dear Readers, Change in the world of academic publications is no less The primary, if not the exclusive yardstick by which dramatic than in the ‘‘real’’ world of the economy. This excellence is measured is their output in highly ranked seems to be true especially in our part of the world, the journals. applied sciences of management, engineering, economics, • Last but not least: the practice of writing dissertations operations research, and logistics—except: the direction is and habilitation research is rapidly shifting from the different! While the challenge to many ‘‘real world’’ traditional monograph-type, book-length piece of businesses and to policy and decision makers of the recent research to ‘‘cumulative’’ dissertations and habilitation years has been to cope with a precipitous decline in volumes, where three, four, or more refereed journal demand, production, and financial supplies in many publications are bound together. Some estimates that I industries, we see and foresee an equally dramatic rise in have—just from the German ‘‘demand’’ for A and B the demand for opportunities to publish academic work. journal publications—suggest that in the next few years The observations that I make in our German-language an additional 40 to 60 aspiring Ph.D. students in the and broader European academic community suggest that field of logistics and supply chain management will the pressures to ‘‘publish or perish’’ are increasing now far want to place their three or more papers in A and B beyond the levels of the past. More precisely, it is now journals per annum to substitute what used to be ‘‘publish in A- and B-ranked journals…or else!’’ for aca- monograph dissertations. And that is just Germany, demics working on their careers and reputation. accounting for less than a quarter of the European Some reasons are obvious: logistics community! • Where there are respected and accepted national What does this mean? There will be much tighter journals in their respective languages (other than competition for getting papers accepted in those journals English), these are declining in importance. Papers of that already have established good rankings. There will be whatever quality, which are published there, are rapidly longer and longer waiting periods for accepted work to be losing their value on resumes and publications lists. printed. And there is need for more outlets that can publish • The competition between universities for positions of excellent academic work and that gain A and B acceptance excellence has become as global as the competition in the rankings. between international corporations in markets in the For a new international journal like our Logistics automotive and electronics industries, and elsewhere. Research, overall, that sounds like good news. We have and will have a rising supply of submissions (and we welcome them!). But this development also poses signifi- cant challenges to us, the editors of the journal, to the P. Klaus (&) institutions that put out journal rankings, and to the broader Nurnberg, Germany academic community that supplies the judgement calls. e-mail: peter.klaus@atl.fraunhofer.de 123 70 Logist. Res. (2009) 1:69–70 We must make sure that the increased flow of manu- in recent years. Bretzke is suggesting that we may not have script submissions—more often from less experienced been critical enough. We invite your comments and criti- young researchers than in the past—does not result in cisms about his argument to start a discussion about this lowering standards of the publication. We must succeed in important issue. finding and maintaining a growing number of experienced The second paper by Halldorsson, Kotzab, and Skjoett- and dedicated reviewers to the cumbersome task of sup- Larsen addresses another of the ‘‘top’’ subjects of our time porting authors in the publication process. And we have to in a similar fashion. They ask whether the effects of supply manage the review process speedily and well. chain management’s growing acceptance are a blessing or But the institutions and peers that do the journal rank- a curse. ings must also cooperate: A traditionally multi-year pro- Obermeier’s paper is a rare study that provides and cess of noticing and evaluating new journals must become analyzes data on changes in inventory levels—as one of the more reactive to a rapidly changing and growing world of key output variables that should be positively affected by publication platforms. And the questions of what makes the growing sophistication of logistics. academic contributions to an applied, interdisciplinary And finally, Jeschonowski, Schmitz, Wallenburg, and science like Logistics ‘‘excellent’’ today—and tomorrow— Weber provide a broad and deep review of the evolution must be considered and reconsidered continuously, as the and advances in the field of controlling and control systems real world changes, which we are expected to help. in logistics. We want Logistics Research to make a contribution I hope you will enjoy and benefit from studying towards meeting these challenges, and we ask you, our Logistics Research! readers and authors, to help us do this better with every issue! The second issue, which you hold in your hands, starts with a somewhat provocative article by Bretzke on the aspirations and limitations of the concept of supply chain Peter Klaus, Editor-in-Chief management, which has been receiving so much attention August 2009.

Journal

Logistics ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 2009

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