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Thermal shock resistance of sodalime glass eroded by sandblasting

Thermal shock resistance of sodalime glass eroded by sandblasting This is a study of the effect of sandblasting of glass on its thermal shock resistance. A soda-lime flat glass was first eroded on both faces by sandblasting. The mass of the projected sand was the only varying experimental parameter considered. Other usual parameters such as the angle of particle impact, the speed, and the sand grain size were kept constant. The particle’s impacts on the glass surface generated various superficial defects (microcracks, craters, and scaling) that scatter the incident light and reduce the optical transmission and mechanical strength. The obtained eroded specimens were then submitted to thermal shock. The critical temperature differences causing their fracture were determined. The effect of the presence of superficial artificial defects introduced by sandblasting on the glass thermal shock resistance is discussed. The results showed that the most damaged glass specimens are the least resistant to thermal shock. The surface critical defects created by sandblasting are the initiators of the critical thermal shock fracture. The transient thermal stresses propagate instantly these defects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Glass Structures & Engineering Springer Journals

Thermal shock resistance of sodalime glass eroded by sandblasting

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019
Subject
Engineering; Building Construction and Design; Structural Materials; Building Materials
ISSN
2363-5142
eISSN
2363-5150
DOI
10.1007/s40940-019-00113-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This is a study of the effect of sandblasting of glass on its thermal shock resistance. A soda-lime flat glass was first eroded on both faces by sandblasting. The mass of the projected sand was the only varying experimental parameter considered. Other usual parameters such as the angle of particle impact, the speed, and the sand grain size were kept constant. The particle’s impacts on the glass surface generated various superficial defects (microcracks, craters, and scaling) that scatter the incident light and reduce the optical transmission and mechanical strength. The obtained eroded specimens were then submitted to thermal shock. The critical temperature differences causing their fracture were determined. The effect of the presence of superficial artificial defects introduced by sandblasting on the glass thermal shock resistance is discussed. The results showed that the most damaged glass specimens are the least resistant to thermal shock. The surface critical defects created by sandblasting are the initiators of the critical thermal shock fracture. The transient thermal stresses propagate instantly these defects.

Journal

Glass Structures & EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: Jul 14, 2020

References