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The viability of calcined clays and volcanic scoria from western Cameroon as Supplementary Cementitious Material (SCM)

The viability of calcined clays and volcanic scoria from western Cameroon as Supplementary... In order to promote the use of calcined clays and volcanic scoria from the western Cameroon as Supplementary Cementitious Material (SCM), the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fresh and hardened cements were investigated. The cement was formulated by substituting 10, 20, 30, and 40% of clinker by calcined clays from Mayouom (Mkm) and Balengou (MKb), and volcanic scoria from Foumbot (PNf). For each of the three raw materials, the loss on ignition is less 1%, the sum %SiO2 + %Al2O3 + %Fe2O3 is greater than 70%, amorphous phase is present and pozzolanic reactivity with the Chappelle test is greater than 80% of Ca(OH)2 consumed. This makes it possible to classify MKm, MKb and PNf among the pozzolanic materials. The addition of calcined clay to the clinker, result to an increase in the water to cement ratio, unlike the Foumbot pozzolan, which does not really affect this ratio. The three raw material act as setting retarders, with PNf having a greater retarding effect than MKm and MKb. The compressive strengths of the cements formulated in this study shows that with 10% clinker substitution, cements of class 42.5 can be obtained, and that from 20% onwards, the cements obtained are of class 32.5. However, an addition of more than 20% PNf in the clinker produces cements with strength less than 30 MPa at 28 days. Calcined clay from Balengou and Mayouom could be used as a viable alternate source of SCM for cement production with better performances compared to volcanic scoria from Foumbot. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Building Pathology and Rehabilitation Springer Journals

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References (43)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022
ISSN
2365-3159
eISSN
2365-3167
DOI
10.1007/s41024-022-00201-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In order to promote the use of calcined clays and volcanic scoria from the western Cameroon as Supplementary Cementitious Material (SCM), the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of fresh and hardened cements were investigated. The cement was formulated by substituting 10, 20, 30, and 40% of clinker by calcined clays from Mayouom (Mkm) and Balengou (MKb), and volcanic scoria from Foumbot (PNf). For each of the three raw materials, the loss on ignition is less 1%, the sum %SiO2 + %Al2O3 + %Fe2O3 is greater than 70%, amorphous phase is present and pozzolanic reactivity with the Chappelle test is greater than 80% of Ca(OH)2 consumed. This makes it possible to classify MKm, MKb and PNf among the pozzolanic materials. The addition of calcined clay to the clinker, result to an increase in the water to cement ratio, unlike the Foumbot pozzolan, which does not really affect this ratio. The three raw material act as setting retarders, with PNf having a greater retarding effect than MKm and MKb. The compressive strengths of the cements formulated in this study shows that with 10% clinker substitution, cements of class 42.5 can be obtained, and that from 20% onwards, the cements obtained are of class 32.5. However, an addition of more than 20% PNf in the clinker produces cements with strength less than 30 MPa at 28 days. Calcined clay from Balengou and Mayouom could be used as a viable alternate source of SCM for cement production with better performances compared to volcanic scoria from Foumbot.

Journal

Journal of Building Pathology and RehabilitationSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Portland cement; Calcined clay; Volcanic scoria; Supplementary Cementitious Material; Western Cameroon

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