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The “things themselves”: challenging heuristics and inciting empathy via Husserlian phenomenology

The “things themselves”: challenging heuristics and inciting empathy via Husserlian phenomenology I propose that the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl provides a meaningful mode of access to the patient experience. By reflecting on a real-life encounter with grief, my own medical training, and two works of literature, Nausea and Love in the Time of Cholera, I illustrate the application of philosophy and specifically phenomenology to clinical education. Phenomenology allows clinicians to strip away assumptions, habits of thinking, and normative ideas within the clinical encounter in order to enter the descriptive world of the patient. In suspending presuppositions and heuristics, the clinician can better empathize with the vivid, embodied stories that the patient is describing. Finally, the practice of phenomenology makes tangible the complexities of medical illnesses, emotions, and lived experiences. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advances in Health Sciences Education Springer Journals

The “things themselves”: challenging heuristics and inciting empathy via Husserlian phenomenology

Advances in Health Sciences Education , Volume 25 (3) – Aug 4, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature B.V. 2019
Subject
Education; Medical Education
ISSN
1382-4996
eISSN
1573-1677
DOI
10.1007/s10459-019-09926-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I propose that the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl provides a meaningful mode of access to the patient experience. By reflecting on a real-life encounter with grief, my own medical training, and two works of literature, Nausea and Love in the Time of Cholera, I illustrate the application of philosophy and specifically phenomenology to clinical education. Phenomenology allows clinicians to strip away assumptions, habits of thinking, and normative ideas within the clinical encounter in order to enter the descriptive world of the patient. In suspending presuppositions and heuristics, the clinician can better empathize with the vivid, embodied stories that the patient is describing. Finally, the practice of phenomenology makes tangible the complexities of medical illnesses, emotions, and lived experiences.

Journal

Advances in Health Sciences EducationSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 4, 2020

References