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The Sweet Passion Fruit (Passiflora alata) Crop: Genetic and Phenotypic Parameter Estimates and QTL Mapping for Fruit Traits

The Sweet Passion Fruit (Passiflora alata) Crop: Genetic and Phenotypic Parameter Estimates and... Despite their economic importance, some tropical crop species are largely neglected when it comes to conducting genetic studies characterizing target traits for breeding. Herein, genetic and phenotypic parameters as well quantitative trait loci (QTL) are described for the first time in a full-sib progeny of sweet passion fruit (Passiflora alata). A hundred F1 individuals were evaluated in two locations for seven fruit traits: diameter of fruit (DF, in mm), length of fruit (LF, in mm), weight of fruit (WF, in g), thickness of fruit skin (TS, in mm), weight of fruit skin (WS, in g), weight of fruit pulp (WP, in g) and soluble solids (SS, in °Brix). Mixed models fitted complex, unstructured genetic variance-covariance matrices for all traits in phenotypic analysis. Because of important genetic correlations among skin and pulp traits, multiplicative index selection to select the most promising individuals was successfully applied. A previously reported integrated map supported composite interval mapping (CIM) analyses. In total, we found 22 QTLs mapped in seven out of nine linkage groups. Heritabilities (from 59.8 % to 82.7 %) and proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTLs (from 42.0 % to 64.3 %) were comparable for each trait. Principal component analysis on TS, WS and WP showed that the first two principal components (PCs) accounted for 93.6 % of the total variability. CIM analyses on these two PCs revealed five putative QTLs controlling variation for these three traits simultaneously. Thus, genetic improvement for sweet passion fruit should be based on correlations between traits and QTL-related information can be a useful tool. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tropical Plant Biology Springer Journals

The Sweet Passion Fruit (Passiflora alata) Crop: Genetic and Phenotypic Parameter Estimates and QTL Mapping for Fruit Traits

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Plant Sciences; Plant Genetics & Genomics; Plant Breeding/Biotechnology; Plant Ecology; Transgenics
ISSN
1935-9756
eISSN
1935-9764
DOI
10.1007/s12042-016-9181-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite their economic importance, some tropical crop species are largely neglected when it comes to conducting genetic studies characterizing target traits for breeding. Herein, genetic and phenotypic parameters as well quantitative trait loci (QTL) are described for the first time in a full-sib progeny of sweet passion fruit (Passiflora alata). A hundred F1 individuals were evaluated in two locations for seven fruit traits: diameter of fruit (DF, in mm), length of fruit (LF, in mm), weight of fruit (WF, in g), thickness of fruit skin (TS, in mm), weight of fruit skin (WS, in g), weight of fruit pulp (WP, in g) and soluble solids (SS, in °Brix). Mixed models fitted complex, unstructured genetic variance-covariance matrices for all traits in phenotypic analysis. Because of important genetic correlations among skin and pulp traits, multiplicative index selection to select the most promising individuals was successfully applied. A previously reported integrated map supported composite interval mapping (CIM) analyses. In total, we found 22 QTLs mapped in seven out of nine linkage groups. Heritabilities (from 59.8 % to 82.7 %) and proportion of phenotypic variance explained by the QTLs (from 42.0 % to 64.3 %) were comparable for each trait. Principal component analysis on TS, WS and WP showed that the first two principal components (PCs) accounted for 93.6 % of the total variability. CIM analyses on these two PCs revealed five putative QTLs controlling variation for these three traits simultaneously. Thus, genetic improvement for sweet passion fruit should be based on correlations between traits and QTL-related information can be a useful tool.

Journal

Tropical Plant BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 1, 2016

References