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The Social Life of Data

The Social Life of Data Neuroinform (2016) 14:129–130 DOI 10.1007/s12021-016-9298-5 EDITORIAL David N. Kennedy Published online: 4 March 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016 Did you ever feel like your data are your children? register with Facebook (be listed in a public database )? That Each of your children is special, valued and loved, no was a big decision, raising many concerns: Would their iden- matter what they do. They may sometimes get into trou- tify be safe (private health information be protected)? Would ble (not support your hypothesis), and other times be they be bullied (used to show errors in their analysis)? Would the head of their class (get you that high profile publi- they fall in with the ‘wrong’ crowd (be used to refute their own cation). You were excited when each child was con- conclusion)? Would they embarrass you, their parents (turn out ceived (conceived) and proud when each child was born to have errors)? But Facebook had its advantages as well. You (collected). could see your children’s friends (other data they could be You were very close to your children for their first, combined with); what they ‘liked’ and were ‘liked’ by (other formative years (data processing and analysis), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuroinformatics Springer Journals

The Social Life of Data

Neuroinformatics , Volume 14 (2) – Mar 4, 2016

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Bioinformatics; Computational Biology/Bioinformatics; Computer Appl. in Life Sciences; Neurology
ISSN
1539-2791
eISSN
1559-0089
DOI
10.1007/s12021-016-9298-5
pmid
26942593
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Neuroinform (2016) 14:129–130 DOI 10.1007/s12021-016-9298-5 EDITORIAL David N. Kennedy Published online: 4 March 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016 Did you ever feel like your data are your children? register with Facebook (be listed in a public database )? That Each of your children is special, valued and loved, no was a big decision, raising many concerns: Would their iden- matter what they do. They may sometimes get into trou- tify be safe (private health information be protected)? Would ble (not support your hypothesis), and other times be they be bullied (used to show errors in their analysis)? Would the head of their class (get you that high profile publi- they fall in with the ‘wrong’ crowd (be used to refute their own cation). You were excited when each child was con- conclusion)? Would they embarrass you, their parents (turn out ceived (conceived) and proud when each child was born to have errors)? But Facebook had its advantages as well. You (collected). could see your children’s friends (other data they could be You were very close to your children for their first, combined with); what they ‘liked’ and were ‘liked’ by (other formative years (data processing and analysis),

Journal

NeuroinformaticsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 4, 2016

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