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The single parent: Power and the integrity of parenting

The single parent: Power and the integrity of parenting The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 50, No. 2, 1990 THE SINGLE PARENT: POWER AND THE INTEGRITY OF PARENTING Jane Simon Part of growing up consists of recognizing the limits of one's power as well as its possibilities. A major goal for us as psychoanalysts is to empower the patient, to help him or her acquire a realistic sense of power. The confusion about power, namely, what is real and what is illusory, what is constructive and creative and what is destructive, originates in our childhood experience. Many of our patients come to us because the means by which they attained power in the family or their assumptions about power do not serve them in the world. Rollo May cited how love and power are traditionally viewed as opposites of each other. He put forth the common argument that "the more power one shows, the less love; the more love, the less power. Love is seen as powerless and power as loveless. The more one develops his capacity for love, the less he is concerned about manipulation and other aspects of power. Power leads to domination and violence; love leads to equality and human well-being. This argument,.., inherited from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

The single parent: Power and the integrity of parenting

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis , Volume 50 (2): 12 – Jun 1, 1990

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
1990 Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/BF01250914
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American Journal of Psychoanalysis, Vol. 50, No. 2, 1990 THE SINGLE PARENT: POWER AND THE INTEGRITY OF PARENTING Jane Simon Part of growing up consists of recognizing the limits of one's power as well as its possibilities. A major goal for us as psychoanalysts is to empower the patient, to help him or her acquire a realistic sense of power. The confusion about power, namely, what is real and what is illusory, what is constructive and creative and what is destructive, originates in our childhood experience. Many of our patients come to us because the means by which they attained power in the family or their assumptions about power do not serve them in the world. Rollo May cited how love and power are traditionally viewed as opposites of each other. He put forth the common argument that "the more power one shows, the less love; the more love, the less power. Love is seen as powerless and power as loveless. The more one develops his capacity for love, the less he is concerned about manipulation and other aspects of power. Power leads to domination and violence; love leads to equality and human well-being. This argument,.., inherited from

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 1990

Keywords: Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis

References