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The relationship between physiological tremor and the performance of rapid alternating movements in healthy elderly subjects

The relationship between physiological tremor and the performance of rapid alternating movements... The power distribution in the frequency spectrum of tremor is known to vary among individuals and its median power frequency declines with ageing. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a reduction of the central component of physiological tremor would correlate with a reduction of motor performance. Then, the power distribution in the frequency spectrum of tremor from limb extremities might serve as an index of neural drive in healthy elderly subjects. Rest tremor, postural tremor from the finger, and pronation-supination at the wrist were recorded in 102 healthy nuns living in a convent (mean of 72±12 years). Results reveal that several elderly subjects possessed a power distribution of tremor very similar to that of much younger subjects (mean 27 years±3 SD), showing a preponderance of power within the 7.6- to 12.5-Hz band. Duration of pronation-supination cycles of these elderly subjects was, however, similar to that of other elderly subjects who had a preponderance of power within the 3.6- to 7.5-Hz band. Consequently, healthy elderly subjects who possessed a predominance of power within higher frequencies were not at an advantage over other healthy elderly subjects when performing a pronation-supination task. The age of subjects was, however, a better predictor or motor performance. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that, under normal physiological conditions, a reduction of the central component of physiological tremor does not induce a reduction of motor performance. Consequently, tremor recorded at limb extremities cannot be used as an index of neural drive. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

The relationship between physiological tremor and the performance of rapid alternating movements in healthy elderly subjects

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References (36)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Legacy
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
DOI
10.1007/s002210100780
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The power distribution in the frequency spectrum of tremor is known to vary among individuals and its median power frequency declines with ageing. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether a reduction of the central component of physiological tremor would correlate with a reduction of motor performance. Then, the power distribution in the frequency spectrum of tremor from limb extremities might serve as an index of neural drive in healthy elderly subjects. Rest tremor, postural tremor from the finger, and pronation-supination at the wrist were recorded in 102 healthy nuns living in a convent (mean of 72±12 years). Results reveal that several elderly subjects possessed a power distribution of tremor very similar to that of much younger subjects (mean 27 years±3 SD), showing a preponderance of power within the 7.6- to 12.5-Hz band. Duration of pronation-supination cycles of these elderly subjects was, however, similar to that of other elderly subjects who had a preponderance of power within the 3.6- to 7.5-Hz band. Consequently, healthy elderly subjects who possessed a predominance of power within higher frequencies were not at an advantage over other healthy elderly subjects when performing a pronation-supination task. The age of subjects was, however, a better predictor or motor performance. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that, under normal physiological conditions, a reduction of the central component of physiological tremor does not induce a reduction of motor performance. Consequently, tremor recorded at limb extremities cannot be used as an index of neural drive.

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 1, 2001

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