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The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology

The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 63-74 ARTICLE June 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Laboratório de Ornitologia, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Moraes Rego, 1235, CEP 50670-001, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Email: Lnaka1@lsu.edu Received on 12 June 2014. Accepted on 25 June 2014. ABSTRACT: Juan Mazar Barnett was an Argentinean scientist, considered by many as one of the most talented ornithologists of his generation. His untimely death at the early age of 37 shocked the Neotropical ornithological community. Here, I briefly present highlights of his ornithological career, from his early days in Argentina to his last research interests in NE Brazil. Juan’s areas of research included five South American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Chile, where he visited and conducted research in more than 300 localities. He was a prolific writer, having published 51 peer-reviewed articles and short communications, 12 book reviews, 2 audio guides, a book, and a bird identification guide. I present a list of all his publications organized in chronological order, and comment on his most important ornithological findings. Most of his research was conducted in Brazil (23 publications), followed by Argentina (19), and Paraguay (10). Most of his published research was conducted in the Atlantic Forest (13 publications), followed by the Andes and the Cerrado (7 publications each), the Caatinga (6), Patagonia and the Yungas (5 publications each). His preferred topics of research were: i) biogeography and avian distributions (17 publications); ii) breeding biology and natural history (9); iii) new country records for Argentina, Brazil, or Paraguay (8 publications); iv) taxonomy, including the description of a species new to science (7); v) conservation (5), and vi) rediscoveries of species thought to be extinct or lost to science (4). Since his death in 2012, he has been a co-author on 7 publications (five of them as first author), showing that his legacy cannot be fully appraised yet. I hope this work will show the amazing legacy left by Juan to other Neotropical ornithologists, particularly for his many friends, who through different initiatives are keeping his memory alive. Hopefully, the new generations will see that conducting fieldwork in the Neotropics is among the most rewarding experiences a biologist can have. KEY WORDS: Argentina, Brazil, Neotropics, ornithologist, field notes, field research. Juan Mazar Barnett was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, period). Along with bird lists and descriptions of sites, in March 1975, and was probably one of the most his field notes are filled with beautiful drawings, careful talented ornithologists born in the Neotropics. Juan had behavioral notes, descriptions of nests, eggs, chicks, and several attributes that turned him into an outstanding anything that drew the attention to the young naturalist field ornithologist, even as a young boy. With an almost (Figures 3 and 4). His most impressive quality, however, pathological interest in birds, he was not only familiar was how well he understood birds. He somehow knew with the species in the field, including their vocalizations, where to look for them, and where even avian ghosts lost behavior, field marks, and habitat preferences, but also with for decades should be found. their distribution patterns, taxonomy, systematics, and He was only 37 years old when he passed away, evolutionary history. These features rapidly transformed following a long disease that kept him at home for months him in an ornithological guru for novices and seasoned at a time during the last eight years of his life. His untimely ornithologists alike, particularly in Argentina. departure left many of us finishing the projects we had Juan’s field’s experience was difficult to match. started together, and with the difficult task of trying to tell During his early years he visited every corner of Argentina his story, as a way of paying tribute to a dear friend and in search of birds, and as a young man he travelled great ornithologist. Several independent tributes have been widely in other South American countries, particularly launched already, including two long-term ornithological Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia (Figure 1). Overall, he research grants (“Conservar la Argentina: Juan Mazar conducted research in more than 300 localities in eastern Barnett” implemented through Aves Argentinas, and the and southern South America (Figure 2). Most of his “Juan Mazar Barnett Conservation Award” established observations and trips are well described in his more by the Neotropical Bird Club), three memorial articles than 20 field catalogues (particularly for the 1989 – 2002 (Naka 2013a and b; Lowen and Kirwan 2014), and two The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka entire volumes honoring Juan (Neotropical Birding and Buzzetti (Juan’s long-time friend) decided to name a new this one at the Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia). Many species (discovered by both authors) after him (Mazar other tributes are on their way, and these need to be seen Barnett and Buzzetti 2014). Therefore, Mazaria and not only as recognition of his ornithological expertise, mazarbarnetti are names that will likely stay with us for but mostly as a celebration of his friendship that has a long time, reminding us of Juan’s legacy to Neotropical touched so many souls. Additionally, in June 2014 a ornithology. new avian genus honoring Juan was established: Mazaria Juan’s biography, personal life, and motivations had propinqua is a unique bird that dwells on Amazonian river been reviewed elsewhere (Naka, 2013a and b), and will islands (Claramunt 2014). In the current volume, Dante not be discussed in detail in this article. Here, I will face FIGURE 1. Clockwise from upper left. Juan at the Ilhas Moleques do Sul, Santa Catarina, Brazil; Exploring the high Andes at Abra de Lizoite (4.400 m), Jujuy Province, Argentina; Juan, with a Sickle-winged Nightjar (Eleothreptus anomalus) at Isla Yaciretá, Paraguay (December, 2001); Enjoying the best grape juice in Bonito, Mato Grosso do Sul; posing with the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) at Prion Island, Antarctica in 2010. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka the difficult task of presenting Juan’s major contributions or me. Therefore, the map here presented represents to Neotropical ornithology. To do so, I gathered data a conservative estimate of the amount of fieldwork from several sources, including his published articles he has endured in the Neotropics. I also analyzed his and notes, his detailed field catalogues, audio recordings, publications to report the geographical biases of his online databases, and photographs. Much of the data studies in terms of countries and biomes explored, and presented here was obtained from his closest friends and present a quantitative assessment of the main research family. In this article, I provide a map with the localities topics on which he published ornithological data. I will where Juan conducted ornithological research in the then divide this article into the main topics that directed Neotropics (Figure 2). It is very likely that many other his research as a way to organize his lasting contribution localities visited by Juan went unnoticed by his friends to Neotropical ornithology. FIGURE 2. Localities were Juan Mazar Barnett conducted ornithological fieldwork in South America and Antarctica, between 1985 and 2012. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka FIGURE 3. Art by Juan Mazar Barnett. Photographs taken from his field catalogues. Field sketches depicting interesting behaviors. Clockwise from top left. Male display of the Bare-throated Bellbird (Procnias nudicollis); Pheasant Cuckoo (Dromococcyx phasianellus); nesting Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria); Black-collared Swallow (Pygochelidon melanoleuca) Parque Nacional Iguazú, Misiones, Argentina (19 Sept, 1994); White-winged Cotinga (Xipholena atropurpurea) Reserva Biologica Linhares, Espirito Santo, Brazil (18 March, 1997); Saffron Toucanet (Pteroglossus bailloni) trapped in a hole. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka FIGURE 4. Art by Juan Mazar Barnett. Photographs taken from his field catalogues. Clockwise from top left: Red-faced Guan (Penelope dabbenei), Alto Calilegua, Jujuy, Argentina (10 July, 1996); Kaempfer’s Tody Tyrant (Hemitriccus kaempferi), Santa Catarina, Brazil; Smoky-brown Woodpecker (Veniliornis fumigatus), Parque Nacional Calilegua, Jujuy, Argentina (26 July, 1996); Brasilia Tapaculo (Scytalopus novacapitalis), Parque Nacional Serra da Canastra, Minas Gerais, Brazil (17 December, 1996); Tawny Tit-spinetail (Leptasthenura yanacensis) and brown-capped Tit-spinetail (L. fuliginiceps), Alto Calilegua, Jujuy (10 August, 1996); Rufous-webbed Bush Tyrant (Polioxolmis rufipennis) and Red-backed Sierra Finch (Phrygilus dorsalis), NW Argentina. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Scientific legacy Juan was a prolific writer. With more than 50 scientific articles published, he was among the most active ornithologists of his generation. He was particularly good at documenting his discoveries, and his research has been published in 13 peer-reviewed scientific journals (see references). His ornithological interests were broad, but most of his published research involved articles on biogeography and avian distribution (17 articles), breeding biology and natural history (9), new country records (8), taxonomic studies (7), conservation, and (5) rediscovery of species lost to science (4; Figure 5). Besides his peer- reviewed work, he has published a book, co-authored two FIGURE 6. Number of publications authored by Juan Mazar Barnett audio guides, wrote a field guide, and made more than between 1996 and 2014 organized by country were research was 12 book reviews, all of which are full of sharp comments. conducted. Although he was born and lived most of his life in Argentina, the majority of his published research was conducted in Brazil (23 publications), followed by Argentina (19), and Paraguay (10; Figure 6). He was a versatile ornithologist, capable of conducting accurate avian inventories in virtually all Neotropical ecosystems in the countries he had visited. Most of his publications reported on his findings from the Atlantic Forest (13 publications), followed by the Andes and the Cerrado (7 publications each), the Caatinga (6), and Patagonia and the Yungas (5 publications each; Figure 7). Amazonia, the Pampas, and marine ecosystems contributed with 2 publications each. It is noteworthy that Juan published more on Brazilian birds than any other country, including his FIGURE 7. Number of publications authored by Juan Mazar Barnett between 1996 and 2014 organized by Biome were research was own, Argentina. Brazil not only represented the country conducted. with the highest numbers of publications, but Brazilian habitats ranked among the three biomes from where he New country records published the most data: the Atlantic Forest, the Cerrado, and the Caatinga (although most of his research in the Juan started his scientific career at the age of 21, when he Cerrado was conducted in Paraguay). Juan simply loved published his first article reporting a new country record Brazil. This country, like no other, offered him super- for Argentina: the Sooty Grassquit (Tiaris fuliginosa) diverse tropical habitats, great friends, delicious tropical found in Misiones (Mazar Barnett and Herrera 1996). fruits, and the most amazing birds. Then, he documented the presence of Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus) in Brazil (Mazar Barnett 1997b). In the following years, he published another three new country records for Argentina: the Giant Conebill (Oreomanes fraseri) in the Andes (Mazar Barnett et al. 1998d), the Pink-footed Shearwater (Puffinus creatopus) from coastal Patagonia (but found in the drawers of the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales in Buenos Aires; Mazar Barnett and Navas 1998), and the Bolivian Warbling-finch (Poospiza boliviana) in NW Argentina (Mazar Barnett et al. 2001). Then followed Paraguay, where he discovered two new species for the country, including the globally threatened Lesser Nothura (Nothura minor) (Capper et al. 2001b; Mazar Barnett FIGURE 5. Number of publications authored by Juan Mazar Barnett et al. 2004a). Besides those first country records, Juan between 1996 and 2014 organized by topic of research. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka had always paid attention to unusual findings, and in b; Capper et al. 2001a, b). Additionally, a trip to the 1998 he reported extra-limital records for the Rough- Argentinean-Paraguayan border resulted in the first legged Tyrannulet (Phyllomyias burmeisteri) in Argentina nesting record of the South American Bittern (Botaurus (Mazar Barnett 1999b), and the Ocellated Crake pinnatus) in Paraguay (Mazar Barnett et al. 2002). Many (Micropygia schomburgkii) in coastal São Paulo, Brazil of Juan’s publications from Paraguay were related to the (Mazar Barnett 1999b). In the present volume, Juan rediscovery, display description, and nesting behavior of authors posthumously yet another avian discovery for the White-winged Nightjar (Eleothreptus candicans; see Argentina: the Andean Swallow (Orochelidon andecola; below). His studies in Paraguay culminated with a field Mazar Barnett et al. 2014c). guide “Aves de la Reserva Natural del Bosque Mbaracayú: Guía para la Identificación de 200 especies,”published Biogeography and avian distribution by the Fundación Moisés Bertoni (Mazar Barnett and Madroño 2003). Juan has always been fascinated by avian distribution After Paraguay, Juan began exploring Brazil, working patterns, and most of his publications deal with this his way north, from the south to the northeast. His first kind of data. His first biogeographical studies included visits to Brazil were to the southern edge of the Atlantic Argentinean birds, most notably birds form the Andes. Forest, in the states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Juan first co-authored notes on the rare Plushcap and Paraná. Some of his first contributions were from (Catamblyrhynchus diadema; Di Giacomo et al. 1997), a Santa Catarina, where he spent a good amount of time bird with just a handful of previous records in Argentina. (Naka et al. 2000, 2001, Mazar Barnett et al. 2004b). As Subsequently he described the ghostly presence of the he gained experience with Brazilian birds, he intensively Lyre-tailed Nightjar (Uropsalis lyra) in Argentina (Mazar explored eastern Brazil, including the Caatinga and the Barnett et al. 1998c), and published notes on other rare Atlantic forest. His explorations of interior Minas Gerais Andean birds (Mazar Barnett et al. 1998a, 2001), several and Bahia resulted in several publications, particularly of which were previously known in Argentina from just those from the middle São Francisco Valley, at the one or two records. Those initial papers were followed southern tip of the Caatinga (Kirwan and Mazar Barnett by many others, including a range expansion for the 2001; Kirwan et al. 2004; Raposo et al. 2002). White-sided Hillstar (Oreotrochilus leucopleurus; Mazar The Brazilian northeast was a special place for Juan, Barnett 2001b); comments on the migratory status of both within the Caatinga realms in the semi-arid interior the Patagonian population of the Striped Woodpecker and the vanishing Atlantic Forest. During the summer (Picoides lignarius; Mazar Barnett 2003b); data on the of 1997 he visited Curaçá, in the dry interior of the state Broad-Winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus), considered of Bahia (Figure 8), in order to work with the Ararinha a rare visitor in Argentina (Roesler and Mazar Barnett Azul Project. His goal was to survey the region, which was 2004); the first nesting evidence of the Wedge-tailed the last stronghold of Spix’s Macaw (Cyanopsitta spixi), a Hillstar (Oreotrochilus adela) in Argentina (Areta et al. species at the brink of extinction and one of Juan’s most 2006); and new distributional data for the Magellanic wanted birds to see. During several weeks, he walked Plover (Pluvianellus socialis) and the Crested Doradito the dry woodlands of the region, and made detailed (Pseudocolopteryx sclateri) in Buenos Aires (Lowen et al. observations including records of almost 200 bird species, 2009). All his experience in Argentina was then put to which are being reported in this volume (Mazar Barnett et service in one of Juan’s most important contributions, an al. 2014d). Additionally, he documented the presence of “Annotated Checklist of the Birds of Argentina” (Mazar 98 bird species in more than 300 min of tape recordings, Barnett and Pearman 2001), the most comprehensive most of which remain the only documentation of those work of the Argentinean avifauna, later updated species in the area. Juan returned to Curaçá in January online (Mazar Barnett and Pearman 2009) and still a 2000, and his observations of the last Spix’s Macaw were fundamental source for any ornithologist interested in among the last ones made on the species in the wild Argentinean birds. (Barnett et al. 2014d). The Curaçá avian inventory took Studies in Argentina were followed by those in more than 16 years to be completed and published, but other countries, most notably Paraguay, where Juan it was only possible because of Juan’s careful notes and conducted intensive research between 1995 and 1998. field effort obtained during that summer. Juan was also a He was part of an important era for the Paraguayan generous soul, and readily shared the information that he avifauna, following two very successful research projects: gathered so meticulously. His observations of the behavior Proyecto Jacutinga and Proyecto Aguará Ñu, both lead of the Pygmy Nightjar also resulted in two additional by British ornithologists (Clay et al. 1998). Juan was a publications from Curaçá, also published in this volume very active part of these projects and participated in (Ingels et al. 2014; Mazar Barnett et al. 2014a). their publications, which included many avian novelties The Atlantic Forest of the Brazilian northeast and range extensions for Paraguay (Lowen et al. 1997a, captivated Juan like no other place, and from 2000 to Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka 2004 he made several trips to this region. His first papers At that time, he also visited the Amazon, in the states from the Brazilian northeast included data on a handful of Amazonas, Pará, and Roraima, where he embarked of poorly known birds from Alagoas, Sergipe, and Ceará on a three-week expedition along the Rio Branco (Naka (Kirwan and Mazar Barnett 2001), but soon he started et al. 2007). Part of the ornithological findings of that paying attention to the highly endangered avifauna of memorable trip are also being published in this volume the Pernambuco Area of Endemism (see Conservation). (Laranjeiras et al. 2014). FIGURE 8. Juan after pulling the car out of the mud in Curaçá (Bahia) in the Summer of 1997, with his friends and colleagues Yara de Melo Barros (on the wheel), Luciano N. Naka, and Andrei Langeloh Roos. Lost birds to science: the science of rediscovery elusive in the Paraguayan savannas, until its rediscovery in 1995 (Clay et al. 1998, 2001; Capper et al. 2001a). Lost birds, or birds that lacked formal record for decades, In Brazil, Juan was instrumental in documenting the have always attracted Juan’s attention. As mentioned rediscovery of another lost bird, Kaempfer’s Tody-Tyrant above, he first co-authored notes on rare Andean birds, (Hemitriccus kaempferi), an understory species previously many of which were very rare in Argentina at the time unknown in life. Its existence rested solely in the type (Di Giacomo et al. 1997; Mazar Barnett et al. 1998a, c, specimen collected by Kaempfer himself in 1929 and a 2001). His most important records, however, included second bird collected by H. F. Berla in 1950, but noticed those birds “lost to science” or even considered extinct. by scientists only in the early 1990s (Mazar Barnett et al. One of these was the Austral Rail (Rallus antarcticus), 2000; Buzzetti et al. 2003a, b). With these credentials, which remained unseen for nearly 40 years until Juan Juan was optimistic about the survival in Paraguay of a and his friends Santiago Imberti, Marco Della Seta, small population of the Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus and Germán Pugnali rediscovered it in the marshes of glaucus), a bird that has been considered extinct since southern Patagonia in Argentina (Mazar Barnett et al. the mid-19th century. Two unidentified blue macaws 1998b) and Chile (Imberti and Mazar Barnett 1999). seen and tape-recorded in flight during his fieldwork in Juan also played a role in locating a new population of the Paraguay ignited this hope. Further expeditions to find extremely rare White-winged Nightjar, which remained these ghosts, however, proved unsuccessful. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Taxonomy which is finally being done in the current volume (Clay et al. 2014). In 2003, together with Dante Buzzetti, they After being hooked on avian biogeography, Juan began described “the nest and eggs of two Myrmeciza antbirds to pay attention to taxonomy and systematics. He was endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil” (Buzzetti and particularly interested in patterns of geographic variation, Mazar Barnett 2003). His field catalogues from Curaçá and soon in his career he discussed the presence of include detailed breeding information on more than different avian forms in Argentina, as was the case of the 30 different species, including two undescribed nests, Wren-like Rushbird (Phleocryptes melanops schoenobaenus) which are also being described in this volume: those of in NW Argentina (Mazar Barnett 1999a). His studies the Pygmy Nightjar (Nyctipolus hirundinaceus; Mazar in Minas Gerais showed a clear turn in Juan’s interests Barnett et al. 2014a) and the Scarlet-throated Tanager when, together with a team of international researchers, (Compsothraupis loricata; Mazar Barnett et al. 2014b). he discussed the taxonomic relationships of the Minas Besides describing the nest of the Scarlet-throated Gerais Tyrannulet (Phylloscartes roquettei; Raposo et al. Tanager, Juan’s careful observations denoted that not 2002), and a year later pointed out the need to reassign only this species uses helpers to feed the young in the Chordeiles vielliardi to the genus Nyctiprogne (Whitney nest, but that they also use false nests to deceive possible et al. 2003). He then described the nest of the Striated predators. Mazar Barnett et al. (2014b) also described Softtail (Thripophaga macroura), a rare endemic bird the amusing pantomimes of this tanager, as the male of the Brazilian NE, but did so also analyzing other visited the false nest and moved its head as if feeding nests in the genus and studying the relationships of the a non-existing young. In that same paper, Juan and genus based on nest architecture (Mazar Barnett and collaborators also described the social and reproductive Kirwan 2004). By then, Juan had spent a good amount behavior of another Caatinga endemic, the Pale Baywing of time in Bolivia, where together with his friend and (Agelaioides fringillarius), providing evidence of the use colleague Sebastian Herzog, he realized that there was an of helpers as well, which came to be confirmed by Fraga undescribed species of Serpophaga Tyrannulet in Bolivia and D’Angelo (2014), also in this volume. and central Argentina (Herzog and Mazar Barnett 2004). His interest in taxonomy and systematics was growing Conservation fast; he conducted a pioneering molecular study to assess the “Taxonomy and biogeography of the South American Besides obtaining a bachelor’s degree at the University species of the genus Picoides”, a study that rendered him of East Anglia, his three years in the UK had a strong to graduate with first class honors in Ecology and Biology influence on his professional life. During his time in in 2001 at the University of East Anglia. Europe, Juan worked in the Threatened Birds of the World Program of BirdLife International at Cambridge. Breeding biology and natural history Although conservation was not his main area of expertise, many of his projects were conservation-related, either Since Juan was a young ornithologist, he had been in Paraguay (Clay et al. 1998), the Pampas (Lowen and interested in natural history. Despite his interest in rare Marzar Barnett 2010), Patagonia (Mazar Barnett et al. birds, Juan could spend hours looking at common birds in 2014b), or elsewhere in the Neotropics (Stouffer et al. uncommon situations. One of his drawings ornamenting 2011). Juan’s interests in conservation were far beyond his field notes include a Saffron Toucanet (Pteroglossus the academic exercise of modeling species lost. He could bailloni) getting stuck in a hole, as it was trying to reach get overwhelmingly irritated, frustrated, and personally the content of a putative nest (Figure 3)! One aspect of offended when witnessing the disastrous human bird behavior that have always attracted Juan’s attention management of nature. was breeding. Only a handful of nests described in his Once he was back from Europe, Juan worked on notebooks actually made it into print. One of the most several conservation projects in both Argentina and Brazil. memorable ones included a broken arm after falling In collaboration with the Sociedade para a Conservação from a Caracara’s nest near Buenos Aires. One of his first das Aves (SAVE) he conducted fieldwork in NE Brazil, articles mentioned above was actually entitled “Natural in Pernambuco and Alagoas between 1999 and 2003, history notes on some little known birds in north-west where he witnessed the almost complete destruction Argentina” (Mazar Barnett et al. 1998a). Many of his of the Atlantic forests of the Pernambuco Area of notes were about nocturnal birds, such as owls and Endemism. Possibly one of his largest contributions nightjars. Following his fieldwork in Paraguay, where he to conservation followed his discovery of “A new site was part of the team that re-discovered the White-winged for the Alagoas endemics” (Mazar Barnett et al. 2003), Nightjar, it was time to describe the reproductive display where he highlighted the presence of many endemic and of this species (Clay et al. 2001). It took another 15 years endangered species in a forest fragment that had been to describe the eggs, chick, and nest-site of this species, overlooked until then. This discovery ignited “Renewed Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka hope for the threatened avian endemics of northeastern for sending copies of some of Juan’s tapes being archived Brazil” (Mazar Barnett et al. 2005), and his activities at at the Macaulay Library. I am grateful to Catherine the forest fragment were vital for the establishment of a Bechtoldt and Santiago Claramunt for reviewing and privately owned reserve at Frei Caneca, in Pernambuco. commenting on a previous draft of this manuscript. Avian vocalizations LITERATURE CITED Juan had always paid special attention to avian Publications by Juan Mazar Barnett (in chronological order) vocalizations, and was among the first in Argentina to embrace bioacoustics to conduct avian surveys in the early Claramunt, S. 2014. Phylogenetic relationships among Synallaxini 1990s. He quickly built a very substantial collection of spinetails (Aves: Furnariidae) reveal a new biogeographic pattern recordings. When he was in the field (which represented across the Amazon and Paraná river basins. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 78: 223-231. most of the time) he would hardly ever be seen without Lowen, J. C. & Kirwan, G.M. 2014. Neotropical Birding 14: a his tape recorder. He co-authored two audio guides, tribute to Juan Mazar Barnett. Neotropical Birding, 14: 2-3. including “Sonidos de aves de Calilegua” (Krabbe et al. Naka, L.N. 2013a. In Memoriam: Juan Mazar-Barnett, 1975 – 2012. 2001), and “Bird sounds of Argentina and adjacent areas” The Condor, 115: 688-692. (Imberti et al. 2009). Juan’s generosity in sharing his data Naka, L.N. 2013b. Juan Mazar-Barnett (1975 - 2012): una vida entre plumas y amigos. El Hornero, 28(1): (in press). is apparent from his many recordings available in “Birds of Bolivia” (Mayer 2000), or freely available through xeno-canto (www.xeno-canto.org). His entire collection Mazar Barnett, J. & Herrera, J. 1996. Primer registro de Tiaris is currently being digitized and archived at the Macaulay fuliginosa (Wied, 1830) para la Argentina. Hornero, 14: 73–74. Library, the largest avian audio repository in the world, and hopefully will be available for research purposes in Clay, R. P.; Capper, D. R.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Burfield, I. J.; the near future. Esquivel, E. Z.; Fariña, R.; Kennedy, C. P .; Perrens, M. & Pople, R. G. 1998. White-winged Nightjars Caprimulgus candicans and cerrado conservation: the key findings of Project Aguara Ñu 1997. Concluding remarks Cotinga, 9: 52–56. Di Giacomo, A. G.; Di Giacomo, A. S.; Mazar Barnett, J. & López Looking at the map of the localities he visited, one can Lanús, B. M. 1997. Nuevas citas de Catamblyrhynchus diadema only recall his first steps in Patagonia when he was 9 years en el noroeste argentino. Hornero, 14: 264–266. Lowen, J. C.; Clay, R. P.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Madroño Nieto, N. old, or in the Yungas of Calilegua. He has been a bright A.; Pearman, M.; López Lanús, B.; Tobias, J. A.; Liley, D. C.; star since he was 12 years old, and he will continue to Brooks, T. M.; Esquivel, E. Z. & Reid, J. M. 1997. New and shine as long as we remember him with pride and love. noteworthy observations on the Paraguayan avifauna. Bulletin of Even in a relatively short life, he was able to leave a strong the British Ornithologists’ Club, 117: 275–293. Lowen, J. C.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Pearman, M.; Clay, R. P. & López legacy to Neotropical ornithology, not only through his Lanús, B. M. 1997. New distributional information for 25 vast portfolio of publications, but mostly through the species in eastern Paraguay. Ararajuba, 5: 234–237 friendship and character that he has shown along the Mazar Barnett, J. 1997a. Comentarios bibliográficos (do Rosário: As years. Many words have been said about his life, and the aves em Santa Catarina. Distribução geográfica e meio ambiente). things that motivated him to spend several months in the Hornero, 14: 281. Mazar Barnett, J. 1997b. First report of Xenus cinereus field at a time. He simply never got tired of spending his (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) for Brazil. Ararajuba, 5: 236–237. time in the field. He never had enough birds. For those of Mazar Barnett, J. 1997c. Book review (Narosky & Bosso 1995: us that outlived him, we can read his notes and hear his Manual del observador de aves). Cotinga, 8:104–105. comments recorded on tape to have him back with us. I believe Juan lived his life the way he wanted to. He had Mazar Barnett, J. 1998. Book review (del Hoyo et al. 1996: Handbook an exceptional life; he was a master of his time and he will of the birds of the world, vol. 3). Cotinga, 9: 93–95. not be forgotten. Mazar Barnett, J.; Clark, R.; Bodrati, A.; Bodrati, G.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 1998a. Natural history notes on some little known birds in north-west Argentina. Cotinga, 9: 64–75. Mazar Barnett, J.; della Seta, M.; Imberti, S. & G. Pugnali. 1998b. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Notes on the rediscovery of the Austral Rail Rallus antarcticus in Santa Cruz, Argentina. Cotinga, 10: 96–101. I am deeply indebted to Cristina Ollua, Juan’s mother, Mazar Barnett, J. & Navas, J. R. 1998. Primer registro de la Pardela Patas Rosas Puffinus creatopus en las costas argentinas. Hornero, for sharing his field notes, paintings, and photographs 15: 43–44 included in this volume. Many of his friends swiftly Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 1998c. Notas sobre responded to my request of localities, including Germán la presencia y hábitos de Uropsalis lyra en la Argentina. Cotinga, Pugnali, Hernán Casañas, Santiago Imberti, Rob Clay, 9: 61–63. Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 1998d. Primer Ricardo Clark, and Weber Girão. I thank Matt Medler Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka registro del Sai grande Oreomanes fraseri (Passeriformes: 2002 Coerebidae? Thraupidae?) en la Argentina. Hornero, 15: 44–46. Mazar Barnett, J. 2002. Comentarios bibliográficos: Aves del mundo (del Hoyo et al.: Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 6. Mousebirds to hornbills). Hornero, 17: 54. Imberti, S. & Mazar Barnett, J. 1999. Redescubrimiento del Pidén Raposo, M. A.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M. & Parrini, R. 2002. Austral Rallus antarcticus en Chile. Boletín Chileno de Ornitología, New data concerning the distribution, behaviour, ecology and 6: 44–45. taxonomic relationships of Minas Gerais Tyrannulet Phylloscartes Mazar Barnett, J. 1999a. La raza puneña del Junquero (Phleocryptes roquettei. Bird Conservation International, 12: 241–253. melanops schoenobaenus) en la Argentina. Nuestras Aves, 40:13. Mazar Barnett, J.; Coconier, E. G.; Velázquez, M. & Clay, R. P. Mazar Barnett, J. 1999b. Registro extralimital de la Mosqueta Pico 2002. Primer registro de nidificación y actualización sobre la Curvo (Phyllomyias burmeisteri). Nuestras Aves, 40:13. presencia de Botaurus pinnatus en Paraguay. Hornero, 17: 49-51. Mazar Barnett, J. 1999c. Book review (de la Peña & Rumboll 1998: Birds of southern South America and Antarctica). Cotinga, 11: 108–110. Buzzetti, D. R. C. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2003. Description of the nest and eggs of two Myrmeciza antbirds endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Cotinga, 20: 89–93. Mazar Barnett, J. 2000a. Comentários bibliográficos (Isler e Isler: The Buzzetti, D. R. C.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Kirwan, G. M. 2003. tanagers. Natural history, distribution, and identification). Hornero, Photospot: Kaempfer’s Tody-tyrant Hemitriccus kaempferi. 15: 155–155. Cotinga, 20: 95–97. Mazar Barnett, J. 2000b. An extralimital record of Ocellated Crake Mazar Barnett, J. 2003a. Aves de Argentina y Uruguay (Narosky Micropygia schomburgkii from coastal São Paulo, Brazil. Ararajuba, & Yzurieta: Guía para la identificación de las aves de Argentina y 8: 141–142. Uruguay (Edición de Oro). Hornero, 18: 128–130 Mazar Barnett, J. 2000c. Book review (Harris 1998: A guide to the Mazar Barnett, J. 2003b. On the migratory status of the Patagonian birds and mammals of coastal Patagonia). Cotinga, 13: 89–90. population of the Striped Woodpecker Picoides lignarius. Bulletin Mazar Barnett, J. 2000d. Book review (Chantler & Driessens 2000: of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 123: 130–135. Swifts: a guide to the swifts and treeswifts of the world). Cotinga, Mazar Barnett, J. 2003c. Book review (Chebez et al. 1998: Las aves de 16: 109. los parques nacionales de la Argentina). Cotinga, 19: 88. Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M.; Pearman, M.; Naka, L. N. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2003d. Book review (Bencke 2001: Lista de Tobias, J. A. 2000. Rediscovery and subsequent observations of referência das aves do Rio Grande do Sul). Cotinga, 19: 88–89. Kaempfer’s Tody-Tyrant Hemitriccus kaempferi in Santa Catarina, Mazar Barnett, J.; Carlos, J. C. & Roda, S. A. 2003. A new site for Brazil, with notes on conservation, life-history and plumage. Bird the Alagoas endemics. Cotinga, 20: 13. Conservation International, 10: 371–379. Mazar Barnett, J. & Madroño Nieto, A. 2003. Aves de la Reserva Naka, L. N.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M.; Tobias, J. A. & Natural del Bosque Mbaracayú: Guía para la Identificación de 200 Azevedo, M. A. G. 2000. New and noteworthy bird records from especies. Asunción: Fundación Moisés Bertoni. Santa Catarina state, Brazil. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Whitney, B. M.; Pacheco, J. F.; Moreira da Fonseca, P. S.; Webster, Club, 120: 237–250. R. E.; Kirwan, G. M. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2003. Reassignment of Chordeiles vielliardi Lencioni-Neto, 1994, to Nyctiprogne Bonaparte, 1857, with comments on the latter genus and some Capper, D. R.; Clay, R. P.; Madroño Nieto, A. & Mazar Barnett, J. presumably related chordeilines (Caprimulgidae). Bulletin of the 2001a. New information on the distribution of twenty-two bird British Ornithologists’ Club, 123: 103–112. species in Paraguay. Ararajuba, 9: 57–59. Capper, D. R.; Clay, R. P.; Madroño Nieto, A.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Burfield, I. J.; Ezquivel, E. Z.; Kennedy, C. P.; Perrens, M. Z. & Kirwan, G. M.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Vasconcelos, M.F.; Raposo, M. Pople, R. G. 2001b. First records, noteworthy observations and A.; D’Angelo-Neto, S. & Roesler, I. 2004. Further comments new distributional data for birds in Paraguay. Bulletin of the British on the avifauna of the middle São Francisco Valley, Minas Gerais, Ornithologist’s Club, 121: 23–37. Brazil. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 124: 207–220. Kirwan, G. M. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2001. New bird records from Mazar Barnett, J. & Kirwan, G. M. 2004. Notes on the nest of the north-east Brazil. Cotinga, 15: 67–68. Striated Softtail (Thripophaga macroura), with comments on a nest Kirwan, G. M.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Minns, J. 2001. Significant of Plain Softtail (T. fusciceps) and relationships of the genus based ornithological observations from the Rio São Francisco on nest architecture. Ornitologia Neotropical, 15: 257–263. Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil, with notes on conservation and Mazar Barnett, J.; Klavins, J.; del Castillo, H.; Coconier, E. & biogeography. Ararajuba, 9: 145–161. Clay, R. 2004a. Nothura minor (Tinamidae) a globally threatened Krabbe, N.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Sureda, A. L. & Lacci, A. 2001. Cerrado species new to Paraguay. Ararajuba, 12: 153–155. Sonidos de aves de Calilegua. Buenos Aires: Editorial L.O.L.A. Mazar Barnett, J.; Minns, J.; Kirwan, G. M. & Remold, H. 2004b. Mazar Barnett, J. 2001a. Comentarios bibliográficos: Aves del Informações adicionais sobre as aves dos estados do Paraná, Santa mundo (del Hoyo et al.: Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume Catarina e Rio Grande do Sul. Ararajuba, 12: 53–56. 4. Sandgrouse to cuckoos). Hornero, 16: 56–57. Roesler, I. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2004. Nuevos registros del Aguilucho Mazar Barnett, J. 2001b. Nuevo registro del picaflor andino Alas Anchas (Buteo platypterus) en Argentina. Hornero, 19: 37-40. (Oreotrochilus leucopleurus) para Santa Cruz (Argentina). Nuestras Aves, 41: 31. Mazar Barnett, J. and Pearman, M. 2001. Lista comentada de las Mazar Barnett, J.; Carlos, J. C. and S. A. Roda. 2005. Renewed aves argentinas / Annotated checklist of Argentina. Barcelona: Lynx hope for the threatened avian endemics of northeastern Brazil. Edicions. Biodiversity and Conservation 14:2265–2274. Naka, L. N.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M.; Tobias, J. & Buzzetti, D. 2001. Records of bird species previously considered uncommon in Santa Catarina state. Cotinga, 16: 71–73. Areta, J. I.; Vila Moret, S.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Casañas, H. 2006. Primer registro de nidificación del Picaflor Andino Castaño Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 2001. Bolivian (Oreotrochilus adela) en Argentina. Nuestras Aves, 51: 21–23 Warbling-finch Poospiza boliviana in Argentina. Cotinga, 15: 68. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Clay, R. P.; López Lanús, B.; Tobias, J. A.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Hosner, P.; Johnson, E. I.; Naka, L. N. & Sánchez, C. 2011. Lowen, J. C. 2001. The display of the White-winged Nightjar. No evidence for widespread bird declines in protected South Journal of Field Ornithology, 71: 619–626. American forests. Climatic Change, 108: 383–386 Clay, R. P.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Esquivel, E. 2014. First description Naka, L. N.; Cohn-Haft, M.; Whittaker, A.; Mazar Barnett, of the eggs, chick and nest-site of the White-winged Nightjar J. & Torres, M. F. 2007. Avian biogeography of Amazonian Eleothreptus candicans. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: (in flooded forest in the Rio Branco basin, Brazil. Wilson Journal of press). Ornithology, 119: 439–449. Laranjeiras, T.O.; L.N. Naka, Bechtoldt, C.L.; Costa, T.V.V.; 2009 Andretti, C.B.; Cerqueira, M.C.; Torres, M.F.; Rodrigues, Imberti, S.; Areta, J. I.; Pearman, M.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G.L.; Santos, M.P.D, Vargas, C.F.; Pacheco, A.M.F.; Sardelli, G.; Roesler, I.; Monteleone, D.; Casañas, H. & Rodríguez C.H.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Cohn-Haft, M. 2014. The avifauna of Viruá National Park, Roraima reveals megadiversity in northern Goñi, H. 2009. Birdsounds of Argentina and adjacent areas. Disc 1-Patagonia, Antarctica, and the South Atlantic Islands. United Amazonia. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 138-171. Kingdom: WildSounds. Mazar Barnett, J. & Buzzetti, D. R. C. 2014. A new species of Lowen, J. C.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Pearman, M. 2009. Nueva Cichlocolaptes Reichenbach 1853 (Furnariidae), the ‘gritador-do- información sobre la distribución del Chorlito Ceniciento nordeste’, an undescribed trace of the fading life in northeastern Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 75-94. (Pluvianellus socialis) y del Doradito Copetón (Pseudocolopteryx sclateri) en la provincia de Buenos Aires. Nuestras Aves, 54: 69–71. Mazar Barnett, J.; Ingels, J.; Roos, A. L.; Lima, J. L.; G. & Naka, Mazar Barnett, J. & Pearman, M. 2009. Species lists of birds for L. N. 2014a. Observations on the breeding biology of the Pygmy South American countries and territories: Argentina. Remsen, J. Nightjar Nyctipolus hirundinaceus in the Caatinga of Bahia, Brazil. V. Jr.; Cadena, C. D.; Jaramillo, A.; Nores, M.; Pacheco, J. F.; Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 201-209. Mazar Barnett, J. Imberti, S. & Roesler, I. 2014b. Distribution and Robbins, M. B.; Schulenberg, T. S.; Stiles, F. G.; Stotz, D. F. and K. J. Zimmer. A classification of the bird species of South habitat use of the Austral Rail Rallus antarcticus and perspectives America. American Ornithologists’ Union. http://www.museum. on its conservation. Bird Conservation International, 24: 114-125. lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html. Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G.; Pearman, M.; Bodrati, A.; Moschione, F.; Clark, R.; Roesler, I.; Monteleone, D.; Casañas, H.; Gallardo, F. B.; Segovia, J.; Pagano, L.; Povedano, H. & Lowen, J. C. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2010. Comentários sobre aves Areta, J. I. 2014c. The Andean Swallow (Haplochelidon andecola) pampeanas y otras especies de interés en un “nuevo” sitio de in Argentina. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 172-179. interés en la Provincia de Buenos Aires, la Estancia Rincón de Mazar Barnett, J.; Silva, C. L. G, Araujo, H. F. P.; Roos, A. L.; Cobo. Nuestras Aves, 55: 12–14. Machado, C. G.; Uejima, A. M. K. & Naka, L. N. 2014d. The Avifauna of Curaçá (Bahia), the last stronghold of Spix’s Macaw. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 121-137. Stouffer, P. C.; Cockle, K. L.; Aleixo, A.; Areta, J. I.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Bodrati, A.; Cadena, C. D.; Di Giacomo, A.; Herzog, S. K.; Associate Editor: Catherine Bechtoldt Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ornithology Research Springer Journals

The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology

Ornithology Research , Volume 22 (2) – Jun 1, 2014

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Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 63-74 ARTICLE June 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Laboratório de Ornitologia, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Moraes Rego, 1235, CEP 50670-001, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Email: Lnaka1@lsu.edu Received on 12 June 2014. Accepted on 25 June 2014. ABSTRACT: Juan Mazar Barnett was an Argentinean scientist, considered by many as one of the most talented ornithologists of his generation. His untimely death at the early age of 37 shocked the Neotropical ornithological community. Here, I briefly present highlights of his ornithological career, from his early days in Argentina to his last research interests in NE Brazil. Juan’s areas of research included five South American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Chile, where he visited and conducted research in more than 300 localities. He was a prolific writer, having published 51 peer-reviewed articles and short communications, 12 book reviews, 2 audio guides, a book, and a bird identification guide. I present a list of all his publications organized in chronological order, and comment on his most important ornithological findings. Most of his research was conducted in Brazil (23 publications), followed by Argentina (19), and Paraguay (10). Most of his published research was conducted in the Atlantic Forest (13 publications), followed by the Andes and the Cerrado (7 publications each), the Caatinga (6), Patagonia and the Yungas (5 publications each). His preferred topics of research were: i) biogeography and avian distributions (17 publications); ii) breeding biology and natural history (9); iii) new country records for Argentina, Brazil, or Paraguay (8 publications); iv) taxonomy, including the description of a species new to science (7); v) conservation (5), and vi) rediscoveries of species thought to be extinct or lost to science (4). Since his death in 2012, he has been a co-author on 7 publications (five of them as first author), showing that his legacy cannot be fully appraised yet. I hope this work will show the amazing legacy left by Juan to other Neotropical ornithologists, particularly for his many friends, who through different initiatives are keeping his memory alive. Hopefully, the new generations will see that conducting fieldwork in the Neotropics is among the most rewarding experiences a biologist can have. KEY WORDS: Argentina, Brazil, Neotropics, ornithologist, field notes, field research. Juan Mazar Barnett was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, period). Along with bird lists and descriptions of sites, in March 1975, and was probably one of the most his field notes are filled with beautiful drawings, careful talented ornithologists born in the Neotropics. Juan had behavioral notes, descriptions of nests, eggs, chicks, and several attributes that turned him into an outstanding anything that drew the attention to the young naturalist field ornithologist, even as a young boy. With an almost (Figures 3 and 4). His most impressive quality, however, pathological interest in birds, he was not only familiar was how well he understood birds. He somehow knew with the species in the field, including their vocalizations, where to look for them, and where even avian ghosts lost behavior, field marks, and habitat preferences, but also with for decades should be found. their distribution patterns, taxonomy, systematics, and He was only 37 years old when he passed away, evolutionary history. These features rapidly transformed following a long disease that kept him at home for months him in an ornithological guru for novices and seasoned at a time during the last eight years of his life. His untimely ornithologists alike, particularly in Argentina. departure left many of us finishing the projects we had Juan’s field’s experience was difficult to match. started together, and with the difficult task of trying to tell During his early years he visited every corner of Argentina his story, as a way of paying tribute to a dear friend and in search of birds, and as a young man he travelled great ornithologist. Several independent tributes have been widely in other South American countries, particularly launched already, including two long-term ornithological Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia (Figure 1). Overall, he research grants (“Conservar la Argentina: Juan Mazar conducted research in more than 300 localities in eastern Barnett” implemented through Aves Argentinas, and the and southern South America (Figure 2). Most of his “Juan Mazar Barnett Conservation Award” established observations and trips are well described in his more by the Neotropical Bird Club), three memorial articles than 20 field catalogues (particularly for the 1989 – 2002 (Naka 2013a and b; Lowen and Kirwan 2014), and two The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka entire volumes honoring Juan (Neotropical Birding and Buzzetti (Juan’s long-time friend) decided to name a new this one at the Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia). Many species (discovered by both authors) after him (Mazar other tributes are on their way, and these need to be seen Barnett and Buzzetti 2014). Therefore, Mazaria and not only as recognition of his ornithological expertise, mazarbarnetti are names that will likely stay with us for but mostly as a celebration of his friendship that has a long time, reminding us of Juan’s legacy to Neotropical touched so many souls. Additionally, in June 2014 a ornithology. new avian genus honoring Juan was established: Mazaria Juan’s biography, personal life, and motivations had propinqua is a unique bird that dwells on Amazonian river been reviewed elsewhere (Naka, 2013a and b), and will islands (Claramunt 2014). In the current volume, Dante not be discussed in detail in this article. Here, I will face FIGURE 1. Clockwise from upper left. Juan at the Ilhas Moleques do Sul, Santa Catarina, Brazil; Exploring the high Andes at Abra de Lizoite (4.400 m), Jujuy Province, Argentina; Juan, with a Sickle-winged Nightjar (Eleothreptus anomalus) at Isla Yaciretá, Paraguay (December, 2001); Enjoying the best grape juice in Bonito, Mato Grosso do Sul; posing with the Wandering Albatross (Diomedea exulans) at Prion Island, Antarctica in 2010. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka the difficult task of presenting Juan’s major contributions or me. Therefore, the map here presented represents to Neotropical ornithology. To do so, I gathered data a conservative estimate of the amount of fieldwork from several sources, including his published articles he has endured in the Neotropics. I also analyzed his and notes, his detailed field catalogues, audio recordings, publications to report the geographical biases of his online databases, and photographs. Much of the data studies in terms of countries and biomes explored, and presented here was obtained from his closest friends and present a quantitative assessment of the main research family. In this article, I provide a map with the localities topics on which he published ornithological data. I will where Juan conducted ornithological research in the then divide this article into the main topics that directed Neotropics (Figure 2). It is very likely that many other his research as a way to organize his lasting contribution localities visited by Juan went unnoticed by his friends to Neotropical ornithology. FIGURE 2. Localities were Juan Mazar Barnett conducted ornithological fieldwork in South America and Antarctica, between 1985 and 2012. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka FIGURE 3. Art by Juan Mazar Barnett. Photographs taken from his field catalogues. Field sketches depicting interesting behaviors. Clockwise from top left. Male display of the Bare-throated Bellbird (Procnias nudicollis); Pheasant Cuckoo (Dromococcyx phasianellus); nesting Jabiru (Jabiru mycteria); Black-collared Swallow (Pygochelidon melanoleuca) Parque Nacional Iguazú, Misiones, Argentina (19 Sept, 1994); White-winged Cotinga (Xipholena atropurpurea) Reserva Biologica Linhares, Espirito Santo, Brazil (18 March, 1997); Saffron Toucanet (Pteroglossus bailloni) trapped in a hole. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka FIGURE 4. Art by Juan Mazar Barnett. Photographs taken from his field catalogues. Clockwise from top left: Red-faced Guan (Penelope dabbenei), Alto Calilegua, Jujuy, Argentina (10 July, 1996); Kaempfer’s Tody Tyrant (Hemitriccus kaempferi), Santa Catarina, Brazil; Smoky-brown Woodpecker (Veniliornis fumigatus), Parque Nacional Calilegua, Jujuy, Argentina (26 July, 1996); Brasilia Tapaculo (Scytalopus novacapitalis), Parque Nacional Serra da Canastra, Minas Gerais, Brazil (17 December, 1996); Tawny Tit-spinetail (Leptasthenura yanacensis) and brown-capped Tit-spinetail (L. fuliginiceps), Alto Calilegua, Jujuy (10 August, 1996); Rufous-webbed Bush Tyrant (Polioxolmis rufipennis) and Red-backed Sierra Finch (Phrygilus dorsalis), NW Argentina. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Scientific legacy Juan was a prolific writer. With more than 50 scientific articles published, he was among the most active ornithologists of his generation. He was particularly good at documenting his discoveries, and his research has been published in 13 peer-reviewed scientific journals (see references). His ornithological interests were broad, but most of his published research involved articles on biogeography and avian distribution (17 articles), breeding biology and natural history (9), new country records (8), taxonomic studies (7), conservation, and (5) rediscovery of species lost to science (4; Figure 5). Besides his peer- reviewed work, he has published a book, co-authored two FIGURE 6. Number of publications authored by Juan Mazar Barnett audio guides, wrote a field guide, and made more than between 1996 and 2014 organized by country were research was 12 book reviews, all of which are full of sharp comments. conducted. Although he was born and lived most of his life in Argentina, the majority of his published research was conducted in Brazil (23 publications), followed by Argentina (19), and Paraguay (10; Figure 6). He was a versatile ornithologist, capable of conducting accurate avian inventories in virtually all Neotropical ecosystems in the countries he had visited. Most of his publications reported on his findings from the Atlantic Forest (13 publications), followed by the Andes and the Cerrado (7 publications each), the Caatinga (6), and Patagonia and the Yungas (5 publications each; Figure 7). Amazonia, the Pampas, and marine ecosystems contributed with 2 publications each. It is noteworthy that Juan published more on Brazilian birds than any other country, including his FIGURE 7. Number of publications authored by Juan Mazar Barnett between 1996 and 2014 organized by Biome were research was own, Argentina. Brazil not only represented the country conducted. with the highest numbers of publications, but Brazilian habitats ranked among the three biomes from where he New country records published the most data: the Atlantic Forest, the Cerrado, and the Caatinga (although most of his research in the Juan started his scientific career at the age of 21, when he Cerrado was conducted in Paraguay). Juan simply loved published his first article reporting a new country record Brazil. This country, like no other, offered him super- for Argentina: the Sooty Grassquit (Tiaris fuliginosa) diverse tropical habitats, great friends, delicious tropical found in Misiones (Mazar Barnett and Herrera 1996). fruits, and the most amazing birds. Then, he documented the presence of Terek Sandpiper (Xenus cinereus) in Brazil (Mazar Barnett 1997b). In the following years, he published another three new country records for Argentina: the Giant Conebill (Oreomanes fraseri) in the Andes (Mazar Barnett et al. 1998d), the Pink-footed Shearwater (Puffinus creatopus) from coastal Patagonia (but found in the drawers of the Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales in Buenos Aires; Mazar Barnett and Navas 1998), and the Bolivian Warbling-finch (Poospiza boliviana) in NW Argentina (Mazar Barnett et al. 2001). Then followed Paraguay, where he discovered two new species for the country, including the globally threatened Lesser Nothura (Nothura minor) (Capper et al. 2001b; Mazar Barnett FIGURE 5. Number of publications authored by Juan Mazar Barnett et al. 2004a). Besides those first country records, Juan between 1996 and 2014 organized by topic of research. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka had always paid attention to unusual findings, and in b; Capper et al. 2001a, b). Additionally, a trip to the 1998 he reported extra-limital records for the Rough- Argentinean-Paraguayan border resulted in the first legged Tyrannulet (Phyllomyias burmeisteri) in Argentina nesting record of the South American Bittern (Botaurus (Mazar Barnett 1999b), and the Ocellated Crake pinnatus) in Paraguay (Mazar Barnett et al. 2002). Many (Micropygia schomburgkii) in coastal São Paulo, Brazil of Juan’s publications from Paraguay were related to the (Mazar Barnett 1999b). In the present volume, Juan rediscovery, display description, and nesting behavior of authors posthumously yet another avian discovery for the White-winged Nightjar (Eleothreptus candicans; see Argentina: the Andean Swallow (Orochelidon andecola; below). His studies in Paraguay culminated with a field Mazar Barnett et al. 2014c). guide “Aves de la Reserva Natural del Bosque Mbaracayú: Guía para la Identificación de 200 especies,”published Biogeography and avian distribution by the Fundación Moisés Bertoni (Mazar Barnett and Madroño 2003). Juan has always been fascinated by avian distribution After Paraguay, Juan began exploring Brazil, working patterns, and most of his publications deal with this his way north, from the south to the northeast. His first kind of data. His first biogeographical studies included visits to Brazil were to the southern edge of the Atlantic Argentinean birds, most notably birds form the Andes. Forest, in the states of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, Juan first co-authored notes on the rare Plushcap and Paraná. Some of his first contributions were from (Catamblyrhynchus diadema; Di Giacomo et al. 1997), a Santa Catarina, where he spent a good amount of time bird with just a handful of previous records in Argentina. (Naka et al. 2000, 2001, Mazar Barnett et al. 2004b). As Subsequently he described the ghostly presence of the he gained experience with Brazilian birds, he intensively Lyre-tailed Nightjar (Uropsalis lyra) in Argentina (Mazar explored eastern Brazil, including the Caatinga and the Barnett et al. 1998c), and published notes on other rare Atlantic forest. His explorations of interior Minas Gerais Andean birds (Mazar Barnett et al. 1998a, 2001), several and Bahia resulted in several publications, particularly of which were previously known in Argentina from just those from the middle São Francisco Valley, at the one or two records. Those initial papers were followed southern tip of the Caatinga (Kirwan and Mazar Barnett by many others, including a range expansion for the 2001; Kirwan et al. 2004; Raposo et al. 2002). White-sided Hillstar (Oreotrochilus leucopleurus; Mazar The Brazilian northeast was a special place for Juan, Barnett 2001b); comments on the migratory status of both within the Caatinga realms in the semi-arid interior the Patagonian population of the Striped Woodpecker and the vanishing Atlantic Forest. During the summer (Picoides lignarius; Mazar Barnett 2003b); data on the of 1997 he visited Curaçá, in the dry interior of the state Broad-Winged Hawk (Buteo platypterus), considered of Bahia (Figure 8), in order to work with the Ararinha a rare visitor in Argentina (Roesler and Mazar Barnett Azul Project. His goal was to survey the region, which was 2004); the first nesting evidence of the Wedge-tailed the last stronghold of Spix’s Macaw (Cyanopsitta spixi), a Hillstar (Oreotrochilus adela) in Argentina (Areta et al. species at the brink of extinction and one of Juan’s most 2006); and new distributional data for the Magellanic wanted birds to see. During several weeks, he walked Plover (Pluvianellus socialis) and the Crested Doradito the dry woodlands of the region, and made detailed (Pseudocolopteryx sclateri) in Buenos Aires (Lowen et al. observations including records of almost 200 bird species, 2009). All his experience in Argentina was then put to which are being reported in this volume (Mazar Barnett et service in one of Juan’s most important contributions, an al. 2014d). Additionally, he documented the presence of “Annotated Checklist of the Birds of Argentina” (Mazar 98 bird species in more than 300 min of tape recordings, Barnett and Pearman 2001), the most comprehensive most of which remain the only documentation of those work of the Argentinean avifauna, later updated species in the area. Juan returned to Curaçá in January online (Mazar Barnett and Pearman 2009) and still a 2000, and his observations of the last Spix’s Macaw were fundamental source for any ornithologist interested in among the last ones made on the species in the wild Argentinean birds. (Barnett et al. 2014d). The Curaçá avian inventory took Studies in Argentina were followed by those in more than 16 years to be completed and published, but other countries, most notably Paraguay, where Juan it was only possible because of Juan’s careful notes and conducted intensive research between 1995 and 1998. field effort obtained during that summer. Juan was also a He was part of an important era for the Paraguayan generous soul, and readily shared the information that he avifauna, following two very successful research projects: gathered so meticulously. His observations of the behavior Proyecto Jacutinga and Proyecto Aguará Ñu, both lead of the Pygmy Nightjar also resulted in two additional by British ornithologists (Clay et al. 1998). Juan was a publications from Curaçá, also published in this volume very active part of these projects and participated in (Ingels et al. 2014; Mazar Barnett et al. 2014a). their publications, which included many avian novelties The Atlantic Forest of the Brazilian northeast and range extensions for Paraguay (Lowen et al. 1997a, captivated Juan like no other place, and from 2000 to Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka 2004 he made several trips to this region. His first papers At that time, he also visited the Amazon, in the states from the Brazilian northeast included data on a handful of Amazonas, Pará, and Roraima, where he embarked of poorly known birds from Alagoas, Sergipe, and Ceará on a three-week expedition along the Rio Branco (Naka (Kirwan and Mazar Barnett 2001), but soon he started et al. 2007). Part of the ornithological findings of that paying attention to the highly endangered avifauna of memorable trip are also being published in this volume the Pernambuco Area of Endemism (see Conservation). (Laranjeiras et al. 2014). FIGURE 8. Juan after pulling the car out of the mud in Curaçá (Bahia) in the Summer of 1997, with his friends and colleagues Yara de Melo Barros (on the wheel), Luciano N. Naka, and Andrei Langeloh Roos. Lost birds to science: the science of rediscovery elusive in the Paraguayan savannas, until its rediscovery in 1995 (Clay et al. 1998, 2001; Capper et al. 2001a). Lost birds, or birds that lacked formal record for decades, In Brazil, Juan was instrumental in documenting the have always attracted Juan’s attention. As mentioned rediscovery of another lost bird, Kaempfer’s Tody-Tyrant above, he first co-authored notes on rare Andean birds, (Hemitriccus kaempferi), an understory species previously many of which were very rare in Argentina at the time unknown in life. Its existence rested solely in the type (Di Giacomo et al. 1997; Mazar Barnett et al. 1998a, c, specimen collected by Kaempfer himself in 1929 and a 2001). His most important records, however, included second bird collected by H. F. Berla in 1950, but noticed those birds “lost to science” or even considered extinct. by scientists only in the early 1990s (Mazar Barnett et al. One of these was the Austral Rail (Rallus antarcticus), 2000; Buzzetti et al. 2003a, b). With these credentials, which remained unseen for nearly 40 years until Juan Juan was optimistic about the survival in Paraguay of a and his friends Santiago Imberti, Marco Della Seta, small population of the Glaucous Macaw (Anodorhynchus and Germán Pugnali rediscovered it in the marshes of glaucus), a bird that has been considered extinct since southern Patagonia in Argentina (Mazar Barnett et al. the mid-19th century. Two unidentified blue macaws 1998b) and Chile (Imberti and Mazar Barnett 1999). seen and tape-recorded in flight during his fieldwork in Juan also played a role in locating a new population of the Paraguay ignited this hope. Further expeditions to find extremely rare White-winged Nightjar, which remained these ghosts, however, proved unsuccessful. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Taxonomy which is finally being done in the current volume (Clay et al. 2014). In 2003, together with Dante Buzzetti, they After being hooked on avian biogeography, Juan began described “the nest and eggs of two Myrmeciza antbirds to pay attention to taxonomy and systematics. He was endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil” (Buzzetti and particularly interested in patterns of geographic variation, Mazar Barnett 2003). His field catalogues from Curaçá and soon in his career he discussed the presence of include detailed breeding information on more than different avian forms in Argentina, as was the case of the 30 different species, including two undescribed nests, Wren-like Rushbird (Phleocryptes melanops schoenobaenus) which are also being described in this volume: those of in NW Argentina (Mazar Barnett 1999a). His studies the Pygmy Nightjar (Nyctipolus hirundinaceus; Mazar in Minas Gerais showed a clear turn in Juan’s interests Barnett et al. 2014a) and the Scarlet-throated Tanager when, together with a team of international researchers, (Compsothraupis loricata; Mazar Barnett et al. 2014b). he discussed the taxonomic relationships of the Minas Besides describing the nest of the Scarlet-throated Gerais Tyrannulet (Phylloscartes roquettei; Raposo et al. Tanager, Juan’s careful observations denoted that not 2002), and a year later pointed out the need to reassign only this species uses helpers to feed the young in the Chordeiles vielliardi to the genus Nyctiprogne (Whitney nest, but that they also use false nests to deceive possible et al. 2003). He then described the nest of the Striated predators. Mazar Barnett et al. (2014b) also described Softtail (Thripophaga macroura), a rare endemic bird the amusing pantomimes of this tanager, as the male of the Brazilian NE, but did so also analyzing other visited the false nest and moved its head as if feeding nests in the genus and studying the relationships of the a non-existing young. In that same paper, Juan and genus based on nest architecture (Mazar Barnett and collaborators also described the social and reproductive Kirwan 2004). By then, Juan had spent a good amount behavior of another Caatinga endemic, the Pale Baywing of time in Bolivia, where together with his friend and (Agelaioides fringillarius), providing evidence of the use colleague Sebastian Herzog, he realized that there was an of helpers as well, which came to be confirmed by Fraga undescribed species of Serpophaga Tyrannulet in Bolivia and D’Angelo (2014), also in this volume. and central Argentina (Herzog and Mazar Barnett 2004). His interest in taxonomy and systematics was growing Conservation fast; he conducted a pioneering molecular study to assess the “Taxonomy and biogeography of the South American Besides obtaining a bachelor’s degree at the University species of the genus Picoides”, a study that rendered him of East Anglia, his three years in the UK had a strong to graduate with first class honors in Ecology and Biology influence on his professional life. During his time in in 2001 at the University of East Anglia. Europe, Juan worked in the Threatened Birds of the World Program of BirdLife International at Cambridge. Breeding biology and natural history Although conservation was not his main area of expertise, many of his projects were conservation-related, either Since Juan was a young ornithologist, he had been in Paraguay (Clay et al. 1998), the Pampas (Lowen and interested in natural history. Despite his interest in rare Marzar Barnett 2010), Patagonia (Mazar Barnett et al. birds, Juan could spend hours looking at common birds in 2014b), or elsewhere in the Neotropics (Stouffer et al. uncommon situations. One of his drawings ornamenting 2011). Juan’s interests in conservation were far beyond his field notes include a Saffron Toucanet (Pteroglossus the academic exercise of modeling species lost. He could bailloni) getting stuck in a hole, as it was trying to reach get overwhelmingly irritated, frustrated, and personally the content of a putative nest (Figure 3)! One aspect of offended when witnessing the disastrous human bird behavior that have always attracted Juan’s attention management of nature. was breeding. Only a handful of nests described in his Once he was back from Europe, Juan worked on notebooks actually made it into print. One of the most several conservation projects in both Argentina and Brazil. memorable ones included a broken arm after falling In collaboration with the Sociedade para a Conservação from a Caracara’s nest near Buenos Aires. One of his first das Aves (SAVE) he conducted fieldwork in NE Brazil, articles mentioned above was actually entitled “Natural in Pernambuco and Alagoas between 1999 and 2003, history notes on some little known birds in north-west where he witnessed the almost complete destruction Argentina” (Mazar Barnett et al. 1998a). Many of his of the Atlantic forests of the Pernambuco Area of notes were about nocturnal birds, such as owls and Endemism. Possibly one of his largest contributions nightjars. Following his fieldwork in Paraguay, where he to conservation followed his discovery of “A new site was part of the team that re-discovered the White-winged for the Alagoas endemics” (Mazar Barnett et al. 2003), Nightjar, it was time to describe the reproductive display where he highlighted the presence of many endemic and of this species (Clay et al. 2001). It took another 15 years endangered species in a forest fragment that had been to describe the eggs, chick, and nest-site of this species, overlooked until then. This discovery ignited “Renewed Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka hope for the threatened avian endemics of northeastern for sending copies of some of Juan’s tapes being archived Brazil” (Mazar Barnett et al. 2005), and his activities at at the Macaulay Library. I am grateful to Catherine the forest fragment were vital for the establishment of a Bechtoldt and Santiago Claramunt for reviewing and privately owned reserve at Frei Caneca, in Pernambuco. commenting on a previous draft of this manuscript. Avian vocalizations LITERATURE CITED Juan had always paid special attention to avian Publications by Juan Mazar Barnett (in chronological order) vocalizations, and was among the first in Argentina to embrace bioacoustics to conduct avian surveys in the early Claramunt, S. 2014. Phylogenetic relationships among Synallaxini 1990s. He quickly built a very substantial collection of spinetails (Aves: Furnariidae) reveal a new biogeographic pattern recordings. When he was in the field (which represented across the Amazon and Paraná river basins. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, 78: 223-231. most of the time) he would hardly ever be seen without Lowen, J. C. & Kirwan, G.M. 2014. Neotropical Birding 14: a his tape recorder. He co-authored two audio guides, tribute to Juan Mazar Barnett. Neotropical Birding, 14: 2-3. including “Sonidos de aves de Calilegua” (Krabbe et al. Naka, L.N. 2013a. In Memoriam: Juan Mazar-Barnett, 1975 – 2012. 2001), and “Bird sounds of Argentina and adjacent areas” The Condor, 115: 688-692. (Imberti et al. 2009). Juan’s generosity in sharing his data Naka, L.N. 2013b. Juan Mazar-Barnett (1975 - 2012): una vida entre plumas y amigos. El Hornero, 28(1): (in press). is apparent from his many recordings available in “Birds of Bolivia” (Mayer 2000), or freely available through xeno-canto (www.xeno-canto.org). His entire collection Mazar Barnett, J. & Herrera, J. 1996. Primer registro de Tiaris is currently being digitized and archived at the Macaulay fuliginosa (Wied, 1830) para la Argentina. Hornero, 14: 73–74. Library, the largest avian audio repository in the world, and hopefully will be available for research purposes in Clay, R. P.; Capper, D. R.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Burfield, I. J.; the near future. Esquivel, E. Z.; Fariña, R.; Kennedy, C. P .; Perrens, M. & Pople, R. G. 1998. White-winged Nightjars Caprimulgus candicans and cerrado conservation: the key findings of Project Aguara Ñu 1997. Concluding remarks Cotinga, 9: 52–56. Di Giacomo, A. G.; Di Giacomo, A. S.; Mazar Barnett, J. & López Looking at the map of the localities he visited, one can Lanús, B. M. 1997. Nuevas citas de Catamblyrhynchus diadema only recall his first steps in Patagonia when he was 9 years en el noroeste argentino. Hornero, 14: 264–266. Lowen, J. C.; Clay, R. P.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Madroño Nieto, N. old, or in the Yungas of Calilegua. He has been a bright A.; Pearman, M.; López Lanús, B.; Tobias, J. A.; Liley, D. C.; star since he was 12 years old, and he will continue to Brooks, T. M.; Esquivel, E. Z. & Reid, J. M. 1997. New and shine as long as we remember him with pride and love. noteworthy observations on the Paraguayan avifauna. Bulletin of Even in a relatively short life, he was able to leave a strong the British Ornithologists’ Club, 117: 275–293. Lowen, J. C.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Pearman, M.; Clay, R. P. & López legacy to Neotropical ornithology, not only through his Lanús, B. M. 1997. New distributional information for 25 vast portfolio of publications, but mostly through the species in eastern Paraguay. Ararajuba, 5: 234–237 friendship and character that he has shown along the Mazar Barnett, J. 1997a. Comentarios bibliográficos (do Rosário: As years. Many words have been said about his life, and the aves em Santa Catarina. Distribução geográfica e meio ambiente). things that motivated him to spend several months in the Hornero, 14: 281. Mazar Barnett, J. 1997b. First report of Xenus cinereus field at a time. He simply never got tired of spending his (Charadriiformes: Scolopacidae) for Brazil. Ararajuba, 5: 236–237. time in the field. He never had enough birds. For those of Mazar Barnett, J. 1997c. Book review (Narosky & Bosso 1995: us that outlived him, we can read his notes and hear his Manual del observador de aves). Cotinga, 8:104–105. comments recorded on tape to have him back with us. I believe Juan lived his life the way he wanted to. He had Mazar Barnett, J. 1998. Book review (del Hoyo et al. 1996: Handbook an exceptional life; he was a master of his time and he will of the birds of the world, vol. 3). Cotinga, 9: 93–95. not be forgotten. Mazar Barnett, J.; Clark, R.; Bodrati, A.; Bodrati, G.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 1998a. Natural history notes on some little known birds in north-west Argentina. Cotinga, 9: 64–75. Mazar Barnett, J.; della Seta, M.; Imberti, S. & G. Pugnali. 1998b. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Notes on the rediscovery of the Austral Rail Rallus antarcticus in Santa Cruz, Argentina. Cotinga, 10: 96–101. I am deeply indebted to Cristina Ollua, Juan’s mother, Mazar Barnett, J. & Navas, J. R. 1998. Primer registro de la Pardela Patas Rosas Puffinus creatopus en las costas argentinas. Hornero, for sharing his field notes, paintings, and photographs 15: 43–44 included in this volume. Many of his friends swiftly Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 1998c. Notas sobre responded to my request of localities, including Germán la presencia y hábitos de Uropsalis lyra en la Argentina. Cotinga, Pugnali, Hernán Casañas, Santiago Imberti, Rob Clay, 9: 61–63. Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 1998d. Primer Ricardo Clark, and Weber Girão. I thank Matt Medler Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka registro del Sai grande Oreomanes fraseri (Passeriformes: 2002 Coerebidae? Thraupidae?) en la Argentina. Hornero, 15: 44–46. Mazar Barnett, J. 2002. Comentarios bibliográficos: Aves del mundo (del Hoyo et al.: Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume 6. Mousebirds to hornbills). Hornero, 17: 54. Imberti, S. & Mazar Barnett, J. 1999. Redescubrimiento del Pidén Raposo, M. A.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M. & Parrini, R. 2002. Austral Rallus antarcticus en Chile. Boletín Chileno de Ornitología, New data concerning the distribution, behaviour, ecology and 6: 44–45. taxonomic relationships of Minas Gerais Tyrannulet Phylloscartes Mazar Barnett, J. 1999a. La raza puneña del Junquero (Phleocryptes roquettei. Bird Conservation International, 12: 241–253. melanops schoenobaenus) en la Argentina. Nuestras Aves, 40:13. Mazar Barnett, J.; Coconier, E. G.; Velázquez, M. & Clay, R. P. Mazar Barnett, J. 1999b. Registro extralimital de la Mosqueta Pico 2002. Primer registro de nidificación y actualización sobre la Curvo (Phyllomyias burmeisteri). Nuestras Aves, 40:13. presencia de Botaurus pinnatus en Paraguay. Hornero, 17: 49-51. Mazar Barnett, J. 1999c. Book review (de la Peña & Rumboll 1998: Birds of southern South America and Antarctica). Cotinga, 11: 108–110. Buzzetti, D. R. C. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2003. Description of the nest and eggs of two Myrmeciza antbirds endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Brazil. Cotinga, 20: 89–93. Mazar Barnett, J. 2000a. Comentários bibliográficos (Isler e Isler: The Buzzetti, D. R. C.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Kirwan, G. M. 2003. tanagers. Natural history, distribution, and identification). Hornero, Photospot: Kaempfer’s Tody-tyrant Hemitriccus kaempferi. 15: 155–155. Cotinga, 20: 95–97. Mazar Barnett, J. 2000b. An extralimital record of Ocellated Crake Mazar Barnett, J. 2003a. Aves de Argentina y Uruguay (Narosky Micropygia schomburgkii from coastal São Paulo, Brazil. Ararajuba, & Yzurieta: Guía para la identificación de las aves de Argentina y 8: 141–142. Uruguay (Edición de Oro). Hornero, 18: 128–130 Mazar Barnett, J. 2000c. Book review (Harris 1998: A guide to the Mazar Barnett, J. 2003b. On the migratory status of the Patagonian birds and mammals of coastal Patagonia). Cotinga, 13: 89–90. population of the Striped Woodpecker Picoides lignarius. Bulletin Mazar Barnett, J. 2000d. Book review (Chantler & Driessens 2000: of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 123: 130–135. Swifts: a guide to the swifts and treeswifts of the world). Cotinga, Mazar Barnett, J. 2003c. Book review (Chebez et al. 1998: Las aves de 16: 109. los parques nacionales de la Argentina). Cotinga, 19: 88. Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M.; Pearman, M.; Naka, L. N. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2003d. Book review (Bencke 2001: Lista de Tobias, J. A. 2000. Rediscovery and subsequent observations of referência das aves do Rio Grande do Sul). Cotinga, 19: 88–89. Kaempfer’s Tody-Tyrant Hemitriccus kaempferi in Santa Catarina, Mazar Barnett, J.; Carlos, J. C. & Roda, S. A. 2003. A new site for Brazil, with notes on conservation, life-history and plumage. Bird the Alagoas endemics. Cotinga, 20: 13. Conservation International, 10: 371–379. Mazar Barnett, J. & Madroño Nieto, A. 2003. Aves de la Reserva Naka, L. N.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M.; Tobias, J. A. & Natural del Bosque Mbaracayú: Guía para la Identificación de 200 Azevedo, M. A. G. 2000. New and noteworthy bird records from especies. Asunción: Fundación Moisés Bertoni. Santa Catarina state, Brazil. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Whitney, B. M.; Pacheco, J. F.; Moreira da Fonseca, P. S.; Webster, Club, 120: 237–250. R. E.; Kirwan, G. M. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2003. Reassignment of Chordeiles vielliardi Lencioni-Neto, 1994, to Nyctiprogne Bonaparte, 1857, with comments on the latter genus and some Capper, D. R.; Clay, R. P.; Madroño Nieto, A. & Mazar Barnett, J. presumably related chordeilines (Caprimulgidae). Bulletin of the 2001a. New information on the distribution of twenty-two bird British Ornithologists’ Club, 123: 103–112. species in Paraguay. Ararajuba, 9: 57–59. Capper, D. R.; Clay, R. P.; Madroño Nieto, A.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Burfield, I. J.; Ezquivel, E. Z.; Kennedy, C. P.; Perrens, M. Z. & Kirwan, G. M.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Vasconcelos, M.F.; Raposo, M. Pople, R. G. 2001b. First records, noteworthy observations and A.; D’Angelo-Neto, S. & Roesler, I. 2004. Further comments new distributional data for birds in Paraguay. Bulletin of the British on the avifauna of the middle São Francisco Valley, Minas Gerais, Ornithologist’s Club, 121: 23–37. Brazil. Bulletin of the British Ornithologists’ Club, 124: 207–220. Kirwan, G. M. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2001. New bird records from Mazar Barnett, J. & Kirwan, G. M. 2004. Notes on the nest of the north-east Brazil. Cotinga, 15: 67–68. Striated Softtail (Thripophaga macroura), with comments on a nest Kirwan, G. M.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Minns, J. 2001. Significant of Plain Softtail (T. fusciceps) and relationships of the genus based ornithological observations from the Rio São Francisco on nest architecture. Ornitologia Neotropical, 15: 257–263. Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil, with notes on conservation and Mazar Barnett, J.; Klavins, J.; del Castillo, H.; Coconier, E. & biogeography. Ararajuba, 9: 145–161. Clay, R. 2004a. Nothura minor (Tinamidae) a globally threatened Krabbe, N.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Sureda, A. L. & Lacci, A. 2001. Cerrado species new to Paraguay. Ararajuba, 12: 153–155. Sonidos de aves de Calilegua. Buenos Aires: Editorial L.O.L.A. Mazar Barnett, J.; Minns, J.; Kirwan, G. M. & Remold, H. 2004b. Mazar Barnett, J. 2001a. Comentarios bibliográficos: Aves del Informações adicionais sobre as aves dos estados do Paraná, Santa mundo (del Hoyo et al.: Handbook of the birds of the world. Volume Catarina e Rio Grande do Sul. Ararajuba, 12: 53–56. 4. Sandgrouse to cuckoos). Hornero, 16: 56–57. Roesler, I. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2004. Nuevos registros del Aguilucho Mazar Barnett, J. 2001b. Nuevo registro del picaflor andino Alas Anchas (Buteo platypterus) en Argentina. Hornero, 19: 37-40. (Oreotrochilus leucopleurus) para Santa Cruz (Argentina). Nuestras Aves, 41: 31. Mazar Barnett, J. and Pearman, M. 2001. Lista comentada de las Mazar Barnett, J.; Carlos, J. C. and S. A. Roda. 2005. Renewed aves argentinas / Annotated checklist of Argentina. Barcelona: Lynx hope for the threatened avian endemics of northeastern Brazil. Edicions. Biodiversity and Conservation 14:2265–2274. Naka, L. N.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Kirwan, G. M.; Tobias, J. & Buzzetti, D. 2001. Records of bird species previously considered uncommon in Santa Catarina state. Cotinga, 16: 71–73. Areta, J. I.; Vila Moret, S.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Casañas, H. 2006. Primer registro de nidificación del Picaflor Andino Castaño Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G. & Della Seta, M. 2001. Bolivian (Oreotrochilus adela) en Argentina. Nuestras Aves, 51: 21–23 Warbling-finch Poospiza boliviana in Argentina. Cotinga, 15: 68. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014 The legacy of Juan Mazar Barnett (1975–2012) to Neotropical ornithology Luciano Nicolás Naka Clay, R. P.; López Lanús, B.; Tobias, J. A.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Hosner, P.; Johnson, E. I.; Naka, L. N. & Sánchez, C. 2011. Lowen, J. C. 2001. The display of the White-winged Nightjar. No evidence for widespread bird declines in protected South Journal of Field Ornithology, 71: 619–626. American forests. Climatic Change, 108: 383–386 Clay, R. P.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Esquivel, E. 2014. First description Naka, L. N.; Cohn-Haft, M.; Whittaker, A.; Mazar Barnett, of the eggs, chick and nest-site of the White-winged Nightjar J. & Torres, M. F. 2007. Avian biogeography of Amazonian Eleothreptus candicans. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: (in flooded forest in the Rio Branco basin, Brazil. Wilson Journal of press). Ornithology, 119: 439–449. Laranjeiras, T.O.; L.N. Naka, Bechtoldt, C.L.; Costa, T.V.V.; 2009 Andretti, C.B.; Cerqueira, M.C.; Torres, M.F.; Rodrigues, Imberti, S.; Areta, J. I.; Pearman, M.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G.L.; Santos, M.P.D, Vargas, C.F.; Pacheco, A.M.F.; Sardelli, G.; Roesler, I.; Monteleone, D.; Casañas, H. & Rodríguez C.H.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Cohn-Haft, M. 2014. The avifauna of Viruá National Park, Roraima reveals megadiversity in northern Goñi, H. 2009. Birdsounds of Argentina and adjacent areas. Disc 1-Patagonia, Antarctica, and the South Atlantic Islands. United Amazonia. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 138-171. Kingdom: WildSounds. Mazar Barnett, J. & Buzzetti, D. R. C. 2014. A new species of Lowen, J. C.; Mazar Barnett, J. & Pearman, M. 2009. Nueva Cichlocolaptes Reichenbach 1853 (Furnariidae), the ‘gritador-do- información sobre la distribución del Chorlito Ceniciento nordeste’, an undescribed trace of the fading life in northeastern Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 75-94. (Pluvianellus socialis) y del Doradito Copetón (Pseudocolopteryx sclateri) en la provincia de Buenos Aires. Nuestras Aves, 54: 69–71. Mazar Barnett, J.; Ingels, J.; Roos, A. L.; Lima, J. L.; G. & Naka, Mazar Barnett, J. & Pearman, M. 2009. Species lists of birds for L. N. 2014a. Observations on the breeding biology of the Pygmy South American countries and territories: Argentina. Remsen, J. Nightjar Nyctipolus hirundinaceus in the Caatinga of Bahia, Brazil. V. Jr.; Cadena, C. D.; Jaramillo, A.; Nores, M.; Pacheco, J. F.; Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 201-209. Mazar Barnett, J. Imberti, S. & Roesler, I. 2014b. Distribution and Robbins, M. B.; Schulenberg, T. S.; Stiles, F. G.; Stotz, D. F. and K. J. Zimmer. A classification of the bird species of South habitat use of the Austral Rail Rallus antarcticus and perspectives America. American Ornithologists’ Union. http://www.museum. on its conservation. Bird Conservation International, 24: 114-125. lsu.edu/~Remsen/SACCBaseline.html. Mazar Barnett, J.; Pugnali, G.; Pearman, M.; Bodrati, A.; Moschione, F.; Clark, R.; Roesler, I.; Monteleone, D.; Casañas, H.; Gallardo, F. B.; Segovia, J.; Pagano, L.; Povedano, H. & Lowen, J. C. & Mazar Barnett, J. 2010. Comentários sobre aves Areta, J. I. 2014c. The Andean Swallow (Haplochelidon andecola) pampeanas y otras especies de interés en un “nuevo” sitio de in Argentina. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 172-179. interés en la Provincia de Buenos Aires, la Estancia Rincón de Mazar Barnett, J.; Silva, C. L. G, Araujo, H. F. P.; Roos, A. L.; Cobo. Nuestras Aves, 55: 12–14. Machado, C. G.; Uejima, A. M. K. & Naka, L. N. 2014d. The Avifauna of Curaçá (Bahia), the last stronghold of Spix’s Macaw. Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22: 121-137. Stouffer, P. C.; Cockle, K. L.; Aleixo, A.; Areta, J. I.; Mazar Barnett, J.; Bodrati, A.; Cadena, C. D.; Di Giacomo, A.; Herzog, S. K.; Associate Editor: Catherine Bechtoldt Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia, 22(2), 2014

Journal

Ornithology ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 1, 2014

Keywords: Argentina; Brazil; Neotropics; ornithologist; feld notes; feld research

References