Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Impact of Teacher Privileging on Learning Differentiation with Technology

The Impact of Teacher Privileging on Learning Differentiation with Technology This study examines how two teachers taught differentiation using a hand held computer algebra system, which made numerical,graphical and symbolic representations of the derivative readily available. The teachers planned the lessons together but taught their Year 11 classes in very different ways. They had fundamentally different conceptions of mathematics with associated teaching practices,innate ‘privileging’ of representations, and of technology use. This study links these instructional differences to the different differentiation competencies that the classes acquired. Students of the teacher who privileged conceptual understanding and student construction of meaning were more able to interpret derivatives. Students of the teacher who privileged performance of routines made better use of the CAS for solving routine problems. Comparison of the results with an earlier study showed that although each teacher's teaching approach was stable over two years, each used technology differently with further experience of CAS. The teacher who stressed understanding moved away from using CAS, whilst the teacher who stressed rules,adopted it more. The study highlights that within similar overall attainment on student tests, there can be substantial variations of what students know. New technologies provide more approaches to teaching and so greater variations between teaching and the consequent learning may become evident. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Technology, Knowledge and Learning" Springer Journals

The Impact of Teacher Privileging on Learning Differentiation with Technology

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/the-impact-of-teacher-privileging-on-learning-differentiation-with-V0QmeM98ne
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Education; Learning and Instruction; Mathematics Education; Educational Technology; Science Education; Creativity and Arts Education
ISSN
2211-1662
eISSN
1573-1766
DOI
10.1023/A:1017986520658
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study examines how two teachers taught differentiation using a hand held computer algebra system, which made numerical,graphical and symbolic representations of the derivative readily available. The teachers planned the lessons together but taught their Year 11 classes in very different ways. They had fundamentally different conceptions of mathematics with associated teaching practices,innate ‘privileging’ of representations, and of technology use. This study links these instructional differences to the different differentiation competencies that the classes acquired. Students of the teacher who privileged conceptual understanding and student construction of meaning were more able to interpret derivatives. Students of the teacher who privileged performance of routines made better use of the CAS for solving routine problems. Comparison of the results with an earlier study showed that although each teacher's teaching approach was stable over two years, each used technology differently with further experience of CAS. The teacher who stressed understanding moved away from using CAS, whilst the teacher who stressed rules,adopted it more. The study highlights that within similar overall attainment on student tests, there can be substantial variations of what students know. New technologies provide more approaches to teaching and so greater variations between teaching and the consequent learning may become evident.

Journal

"Technology, Knowledge and Learning"Springer Journals

Published: Oct 5, 2004

References