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The Impact of Altitude on Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders in Infants and Children

The Impact of Altitude on Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders in Infants and Children Purpose of Review Millions of children worldwide reside at or sojourn to high-altitude locales and are therefore subjected to hypobaric hypoxic conditions. Such exposure is known to impact respiratory physiology including determinants of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs). This review aims to summarize emerging data on the effects of high altitude on SRBDs in infants and children, to highlight possible pathophysiologic consequences of these effects, and to outline specific topics requiring further investigation. Recent Findings Recent findings demonstrate that intermediate and high-altitude conditions increase central and obstructive respiratory event frequency both in healthy infants and children and in those with symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing. These changes are most pronounced in infancy and in symptomatic children. Exposure to high altitude degrades cognitive performance and increases cardiovascular morbidity. Genetic factors which vary between specific populations modulate the high-altitude response and therefore limit the generalizability of these findings. Summary High-altitude exposure worsens SRBD prevalence and severity when implementing scoring rules and diagnostic criteria developed at low altitude. Whether these changes in polysomnographic parameters contribute to the adverse cardiovas- cular and neurocognitive outcomes observed in high-altitude residents is of critical importance and requires further study. . . . . . Keywords Altitude Sleep-relatedbreathingdisorder Sleep-disorderedbreathing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

The Impact of Altitude on Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders in Infants and Children

Current Sleep Medicine Reports , Volume 5 (2) – Apr 22, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine; General Practice / Family Medicine; Otorhinolaryngology; Neurology; Cardiology; Psychiatry
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-019-00137-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review Millions of children worldwide reside at or sojourn to high-altitude locales and are therefore subjected to hypobaric hypoxic conditions. Such exposure is known to impact respiratory physiology including determinants of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs). This review aims to summarize emerging data on the effects of high altitude on SRBDs in infants and children, to highlight possible pathophysiologic consequences of these effects, and to outline specific topics requiring further investigation. Recent Findings Recent findings demonstrate that intermediate and high-altitude conditions increase central and obstructive respiratory event frequency both in healthy infants and children and in those with symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing. These changes are most pronounced in infancy and in symptomatic children. Exposure to high altitude degrades cognitive performance and increases cardiovascular morbidity. Genetic factors which vary between specific populations modulate the high-altitude response and therefore limit the generalizability of these findings. Summary High-altitude exposure worsens SRBD prevalence and severity when implementing scoring rules and diagnostic criteria developed at low altitude. Whether these changes in polysomnographic parameters contribute to the adverse cardiovas- cular and neurocognitive outcomes observed in high-altitude residents is of critical importance and requires further study. . . . . . Keywords Altitude Sleep-relatedbreathingdisorder Sleep-disorderedbreathing

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 22, 2019

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