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The Epidemiology of “Regrettable Kinship”: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain

The Epidemiology of “Regrettable Kinship”: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe]... In “The Epidemiology of ‘Regrettable Kinship’: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain,” the author analyzes two contemporary cultural texts about women and environmentally-linked illnesses to rethink commonplace understandings of the relationship between gender, disease, and community formation. By reading these narratives side by side, Lynch is able to address difficult issues about gendered subjectivity and the fragile construction of collective political identity. While the female protagonists in the texts Lynch examines relate differently to their illnesses, both portray the ways in which women negotiate the potential and limitations of “illness communities.” http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Medical Humanities Springer Journals

The Epidemiology of “Regrettable Kinship”: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain

Journal of Medical Humanities , Volume 23 (4) – Oct 10, 2004

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References (18)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 by Human Sciences Press, Inc.
Subject
Cultural and Media Studies; Regional and Cultural Studies; Theory of Medicine/Bioethics
ISSN
1041-3545
eISSN
1573-3645
DOI
10.1023/A:1016894318355
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In “The Epidemiology of ‘Regrettable Kinship’: Gender, Epidemic, and Community in Todd Haynes' [Safe] and Richard Powers' Gain,” the author analyzes two contemporary cultural texts about women and environmentally-linked illnesses to rethink commonplace understandings of the relationship between gender, disease, and community formation. By reading these narratives side by side, Lynch is able to address difficult issues about gendered subjectivity and the fragile construction of collective political identity. While the female protagonists in the texts Lynch examines relate differently to their illnesses, both portray the ways in which women negotiate the potential and limitations of “illness communities.”

Journal

Journal of Medical HumanitiesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 10, 2004

There are no references for this article.