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Technologies for Wood Preservation in Historic Preservation

Technologies for Wood Preservation in Historic Preservation Because of the abundant forests of the world, wood is one of the most common materials found in historic buildings. Wood is relatively easy to fabricate into beams, columns, and roof systems using simple hand tools. However, because of its biological origin, wood is one of the most complex constructions materials. It is produced by thousands of different species of trees, and each type of wood has unique properties. Wood has an affinity for moisture and this can lead to biological deterioration caused by insects and decay fungi. This chapter presents information on understanding and preventing the mechanisms of wood deterioration in historic buildings. The chapter includes a discussion of wood preservation and technology, including wood finishes and wood preservative treatments, diffusible preservatives, and naturally durable wood species. A brief discussion about the repair of deteriorated timbers in buildings is also included. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives and Museum Informatics Springer Journals

Technologies for Wood Preservation in Historic Preservation

Archives and Museum Informatics , Volume 13 (4) – Sep 29, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Data Structures, Cryptology and Information Theory; Document Preparation and Text Processing; Management of Computing and Information Systems; Library Science; Arts
ISSN
1042-1467
eISSN
1573-7500
DOI
10.1023/A:1012468326445
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Because of the abundant forests of the world, wood is one of the most common materials found in historic buildings. Wood is relatively easy to fabricate into beams, columns, and roof systems using simple hand tools. However, because of its biological origin, wood is one of the most complex constructions materials. It is produced by thousands of different species of trees, and each type of wood has unique properties. Wood has an affinity for moisture and this can lead to biological deterioration caused by insects and decay fungi. This chapter presents information on understanding and preventing the mechanisms of wood deterioration in historic buildings. The chapter includes a discussion of wood preservation and technology, including wood finishes and wood preservative treatments, diffusible preservatives, and naturally durable wood species. A brief discussion about the repair of deteriorated timbers in buildings is also included.

Journal

Archives and Museum InformaticsSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 29, 2004

References