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Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging...

Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging... Editorial Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging... Effective assessment of our patients' condition necessarily involves clinical examination. However, the image attests to the possible error which wUi be recorded and transmitted. The surgical indication will be based upon this image justifying an invasive surgical procedure, it is lasting proof of the clinical reasoning that underlies our decision f-- lmaging techniques still prove useful pinpoint the painful area (diskography with memory / ,1 I ~ intraoperatively to perform the required pain test). Here, the image is replaced by sign of pain [__J surgical step at the right level, on the or its absence which is no longer hypothesized but appropriate side and to successfully monitor the identified or relieved. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty progress of the surgery : release, reduction and fixation. are salvage procedures for patients with osteoporotic Thereafter, it will be one of the criteria in support of the collapsed spine unable to undergo surgery. Laser treatment reaches tumours otherwise difficult to locate follow-up, evidencing once again the validity of the and target, for which surgery would be risky and surgical treatment. On the other hand, the image could be turned against us by revealing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png ArgoSpine News & Journal Springer Journals

Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging...

ArgoSpine News & Journal , Volume 20 (1) – May 7, 2009

Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging...

Abstract

Editorial Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging... Effective assessment of our patients' condition necessarily involves clinical examination. However, the image attests to the possible error which wUi be recorded and transmitted. The surgical indication will be based upon this image justifying an invasive surgical procedure, it is lasting proof of the clinical reasoning that underlies our decision f-- lmaging techniques still prove useful pinpoint the painful area...
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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by ARGOS
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Orthopedics; Surgical Orthopedics; Diagnostic Radiology
ISSN
1957-7729
eISSN
1957-7737
DOI
10.1007/BF03040340
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Editorial Spine surgery is born, lives and dies through medical imaging... Effective assessment of our patients' condition necessarily involves clinical examination. However, the image attests to the possible error which wUi be recorded and transmitted. The surgical indication will be based upon this image justifying an invasive surgical procedure, it is lasting proof of the clinical reasoning that underlies our decision f-- lmaging techniques still prove useful pinpoint the painful area (diskography with memory / ,1 I ~ intraoperatively to perform the required pain test). Here, the image is replaced by sign of pain [__J surgical step at the right level, on the or its absence which is no longer hypothesized but appropriate side and to successfully monitor the identified or relieved. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty progress of the surgery : release, reduction and fixation. are salvage procedures for patients with osteoporotic Thereafter, it will be one of the criteria in support of the collapsed spine unable to undergo surgery. Laser treatment reaches tumours otherwise difficult to locate follow-up, evidencing once again the validity of the and target, for which surgery would be risky and surgical treatment. On the other hand, the image could be turned against us by revealing

Journal

ArgoSpine News & JournalSpringer Journals

Published: May 7, 2009

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