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Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Disorders of the Nerve and Muscle Diseases

Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Disorders of the Nerve and Muscle Diseases Purpose of Review Recognize sleep disorders associated with neuromuscular diseases. Recent Findings Neuromuscular diseases can be associated with various sleep disorders. Diaphragmatic weakness, bulbar dysfunction, pharyngeal neuropathy, and central neurodegeneration cause sleep-disordered breathing. Spinal cord hyperexcit- ability, loss of inhibitory descending pathways, and neuropathy promote restless legs syndrome. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin, central dysfunction of sleep regulation, and degeneration of GABAergic intracortical circuits may contribute to central hypersomnia. Dysfunction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, associated with neurodegenerative diseases and certain neuromuscular disorders, may be a common pathophysiologic mechanism responsible for the loss of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep muscle atonia and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Summary Different neuromuscular disorder may be more susceptible to specific sleep disturbances. A low threshold needs to be maintained for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders in neuromuscular diseases, due to their high prevalence, lack of symptom specificity, and presence even in minimally symptomatic patients. However, loss of REM atonia may be protective against sleep-disordered breathing. There are reasonable pathophysiologic mechanisms such as respiratory muscle weakness, upper airway obstruction, and central dysfunction that explain the link between sleep disorders and neuromuscular diseases . . . . Keywords Neuromuscular diseases Sleep-disordered breathing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

Sleep Disturbances in Patients with Disorders of the Nerve and Muscle Diseases

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine; General Practice / Family Medicine; Otorhinolaryngology; Neurology; Cardiology; Psychiatry
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-019-00140-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review Recognize sleep disorders associated with neuromuscular diseases. Recent Findings Neuromuscular diseases can be associated with various sleep disorders. Diaphragmatic weakness, bulbar dysfunction, pharyngeal neuropathy, and central neurodegeneration cause sleep-disordered breathing. Spinal cord hyperexcit- ability, loss of inhibitory descending pathways, and neuropathy promote restless legs syndrome. Reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin, central dysfunction of sleep regulation, and degeneration of GABAergic intracortical circuits may contribute to central hypersomnia. Dysfunction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system, associated with neurodegenerative diseases and certain neuromuscular disorders, may be a common pathophysiologic mechanism responsible for the loss of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep muscle atonia and REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Summary Different neuromuscular disorder may be more susceptible to specific sleep disturbances. A low threshold needs to be maintained for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders in neuromuscular diseases, due to their high prevalence, lack of symptom specificity, and presence even in minimally symptomatic patients. However, loss of REM atonia may be protective against sleep-disordered breathing. There are reasonable pathophysiologic mechanisms such as respiratory muscle weakness, upper airway obstruction, and central dysfunction that explain the link between sleep disorders and neuromuscular diseases . . . . Keywords Neuromuscular diseases Sleep-disordered breathing

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 15, 2019

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