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Sleep and Stroke: New Updates on Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Assessment, and Treatment

Sleep and Stroke: New Updates on Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Assessment, and Treatment Purpose of Review This review aims to discuss the most recent data on sleep disorders and stroke, highlighting relevant findings for the practicing neurologist or health providers who encounter patients with sleep disorders and stroke. Recent Findings Sleep apnea and abnormal sleep duration have the strongest association with stroke risk. Possible mechanisms include non-dipping of blood pressure during sleep, hypoxemia, or reoxygenation leading to sympathetic activation, hyperten- sion, atrial fibrillation, and impaired cerebral hemodynamics. Treatment studies suggest that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for sleep apnea could improve primary prevention of stroke, but data is equivocal for secondary prevention. However, CPAP could improve functional outcomes after stroke. Summary Sleep disorders present an opportunity to improve stroke risk and functional outcomes. However, new strategies are needed to determine the patients at high-risk who would most likely benefit from targeted care. Novel methods for phenotyping sleep disorders could provide personalized stroke care to improve clinical outcomes and public health strategies. . . . Keywords Stroke Sleep disordered breathing Obstructive sleep apnea Positive airway pressure Introduction pathways, and the role of sleep in stroke prevention and treat- ment remain unclear. Sleep is a crucial part of daily function and is increasingly There http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

Sleep and Stroke: New Updates on Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Assessment, and Treatment

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine; General Practice / Family Medicine; Otorhinolaryngology; Neurology; Cardiology; Psychiatry
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-019-00142-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review This review aims to discuss the most recent data on sleep disorders and stroke, highlighting relevant findings for the practicing neurologist or health providers who encounter patients with sleep disorders and stroke. Recent Findings Sleep apnea and abnormal sleep duration have the strongest association with stroke risk. Possible mechanisms include non-dipping of blood pressure during sleep, hypoxemia, or reoxygenation leading to sympathetic activation, hyperten- sion, atrial fibrillation, and impaired cerebral hemodynamics. Treatment studies suggest that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for sleep apnea could improve primary prevention of stroke, but data is equivocal for secondary prevention. However, CPAP could improve functional outcomes after stroke. Summary Sleep disorders present an opportunity to improve stroke risk and functional outcomes. However, new strategies are needed to determine the patients at high-risk who would most likely benefit from targeted care. Novel methods for phenotyping sleep disorders could provide personalized stroke care to improve clinical outcomes and public health strategies. . . . Keywords Stroke Sleep disordered breathing Obstructive sleep apnea Positive airway pressure Introduction pathways, and the role of sleep in stroke prevention and treat- ment remain unclear. Sleep is a crucial part of daily function and is increasingly There

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: May 2, 2019

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