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Rubber Batons and Ricochets: a Case Report

Rubber Batons and Ricochets: a Case Report This paper is actually a case report from an “accident” during SWAT team training, resulting in injuries by Fiocchi rubber baton bullets. Two people were injured in this incident, one suffering multiple finger bone fractures and the other had a 3-cm-wide and 3-cm-deep open wound in the inner thigh, with kind of distant traumas around this wound. Two versions of the incident were in dispute. The prosecutor hypothesis supposed direct shots on the victims from a distance between 5 and 10 m. The defendant version claimed that injuries resulted from uncontrolled ricochets on a concrete floor at a distance between 3 and 5 m from the victims. We had then to assess the behavior of such bullets after ricochets (angles of departure and stability after ricochet, kinetic energy retained) and the wounding ability of such bullets. Our protocol included high-speed video tracking, test shots on simulants, and Doppler radar tracking. The results showed clear support to the prosecutor version, since after a ricochet, the angle of departure never exceeded 5°, the mean loss of velocity was 39 m/s, and the flight was clearly unstable for at least 3 m. Direct shots on simulants appeared positively correlated to the wound, even though this model showed limits in its validity. This case may then be of interest for professionals in the non-lethal weapons area and those involved in army or law enforcement doctrine conception. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
Subject
Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Structural Materials; Textile Engineering; Security Science and Technology
ISSN
2509-8004
eISSN
2367-2544
DOI
10.1007/s41314-019-0027-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper is actually a case report from an “accident” during SWAT team training, resulting in injuries by Fiocchi rubber baton bullets. Two people were injured in this incident, one suffering multiple finger bone fractures and the other had a 3-cm-wide and 3-cm-deep open wound in the inner thigh, with kind of distant traumas around this wound. Two versions of the incident were in dispute. The prosecutor hypothesis supposed direct shots on the victims from a distance between 5 and 10 m. The defendant version claimed that injuries resulted from uncontrolled ricochets on a concrete floor at a distance between 3 and 5 m from the victims. We had then to assess the behavior of such bullets after ricochets (angles of departure and stability after ricochet, kinetic energy retained) and the wounding ability of such bullets. Our protocol included high-speed video tracking, test shots on simulants, and Doppler radar tracking. The results showed clear support to the prosecutor version, since after a ricochet, the angle of departure never exceeded 5°, the mean loss of velocity was 39 m/s, and the flight was clearly unstable for at least 3 m. Direct shots on simulants appeared positively correlated to the wound, even though this model showed limits in its validity. This case may then be of interest for professionals in the non-lethal weapons area and those involved in army or law enforcement doctrine conception.

Journal

Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and SafetySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 20, 2019

References