Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Reconsideration of “Motherhood” in Contemporary Japan

Reconsideration of “Motherhood” in Contemporary Japan In this paper, the author reconsiders “motherhood” in Japan. This reconsideration is based on Japanese psychoanalytic knowledge and a case study of a woman. As a child she was physically abused by her father, and struggled throughout her life with conflicts with her mother. The Japanese have historically idealized the concept of “motherhood” and maintained that it was possible for women to become the ideal mother for their children. The author maintains that “motherhood” is not dependent only on mothers, but is created and shared by fathers, children and all of society. In psychotherapy, the therapist provides a “motherly” energy to the client and shares the “motherhood” fantasy with the client to a certain extent. The therapist assists the client in the gradual process of abandoning the desire to be loved by the ideal mother and accept “motherhood” from other sources. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

Reconsideration of “Motherhood” in Contemporary Japan

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/reconsideration-of-motherhood-in-contemporary-japan-cnX6AdtTF8
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
Subject
Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1007/s11231-004-1815-x
pmid
15754111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this paper, the author reconsiders “motherhood” in Japan. This reconsideration is based on Japanese psychoanalytic knowledge and a case study of a woman. As a child she was physically abused by her father, and struggled throughout her life with conflicts with her mother. The Japanese have historically idealized the concept of “motherhood” and maintained that it was possible for women to become the ideal mother for their children. The author maintains that “motherhood” is not dependent only on mothers, but is created and shared by fathers, children and all of society. In psychotherapy, the therapist provides a “motherly” energy to the client and shares the “motherhood” fantasy with the client to a certain extent. The therapist assists the client in the gradual process of abandoning the desire to be loved by the ideal mother and accept “motherhood” from other sources.

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 17, 2004

References