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Preface

Preface Artificial Intelligence and Law 11: 77–79, 2003. From 12 to 18 August 2003, the 21st World Congress on Law and Philosophy (IVR) was held in Lund, Sweden. One of the special workshops, chaired by Giovanni Sartor and Jaap Hage, was devoted to issues that are also relevant for Artificial Intelligence and Law. This special issue contains a number of the papers that were presented at the workshop. Lindahl and Odelstad describe an algebraic approach to normative systems. In their approach, a well-formed normative system contains two subsystems. One subsystem deals with relations between ‘‘grounds’’, such as being in good faith, and having possession of a good, and their logical compounds. The other subsystem deals with ‘‘consequences’’, such as being under an obligation to return a good to its owner, and their logical compounds. The two subsystems are connected by so-called ‘‘connecting norms’’, which attach deontic consequences to the grounds. The authors argue that if a normative system is well-formed, the so-called ‘‘at least as low’’ relation that holds between connecting norms, determines a lattice or a quasi-lattice. They briefly analyse modifications of normative systems in terms of their approach. A fact the importance of which is in my opinion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); International IT and Media Law, Intellectual Property Law; Philosophy of Law; Legal Aspects of Computing; Information Storage and Retrieval
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1023/B:ARTI.0000046022.21182.32
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artificial Intelligence and Law 11: 77–79, 2003. From 12 to 18 August 2003, the 21st World Congress on Law and Philosophy (IVR) was held in Lund, Sweden. One of the special workshops, chaired by Giovanni Sartor and Jaap Hage, was devoted to issues that are also relevant for Artificial Intelligence and Law. This special issue contains a number of the papers that were presented at the workshop. Lindahl and Odelstad describe an algebraic approach to normative systems. In their approach, a well-formed normative system contains two subsystems. One subsystem deals with relations between ‘‘grounds’’, such as being in good faith, and having possession of a good, and their logical compounds. The other subsystem deals with ‘‘consequences’’, such as being under an obligation to return a good to its owner, and their logical compounds. The two subsystems are connected by so-called ‘‘connecting norms’’, which attach deontic consequences to the grounds. The authors argue that if a normative system is well-formed, the so-called ‘‘at least as low’’ relation that holds between connecting norms, determines a lattice or a quasi-lattice. They briefly analyse modifications of normative systems in terms of their approach. A fact the importance of which is in my opinion

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 7, 2004

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