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Polysomnography in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia for Monitoring Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Pulmonary Reserve

Polysomnography in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia for Monitoring... Purpose of Review Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has progressed over time into a syndrome with multifactorial aetiology and complex pathophysiology characterised by a developmental arrest of the alveolar and pulmonary vasculature compartments. BPD remains common in extremely preterm and very low birth weight infants. Maintaining appropriate oxygen blood levels in BPD infants may promote growth, reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, and lower pulmonary artery pressures. There is no agreed approach on how to best titrate and wean home oxygen treatment in BPD infants. Recent Findings In BPD infants on home oxygen therapy, sleep-disordered breathing is common and appears to be central in origin. However, obstructive apnoea events are also more common in BPD infants. The increased frequency of central apnoea events during sleep in BPD infants has been shown to decline on low-flow oxygen treatment to levels observed in healthy infants. It is hypothesised that brief respiratory pauses in sleep could result in significant oxygen desaturations in BPD infants who have a decreased pulmonary reserve. Those events are scored as central apnoea in polysomnography and are prevented by oxygen treatment. Central apnoea events may also represent disrupted control of breathing secondary to altered chemosensitivity. Summary Polysomnography may http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

Polysomnography in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia for Monitoring Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Pulmonary Reserve

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Switzerland AG
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine; General Practice / Family Medicine; Otorhinolaryngology; Neurology; Cardiology; Psychiatry
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-019-00141-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has progressed over time into a syndrome with multifactorial aetiology and complex pathophysiology characterised by a developmental arrest of the alveolar and pulmonary vasculature compartments. BPD remains common in extremely preterm and very low birth weight infants. Maintaining appropriate oxygen blood levels in BPD infants may promote growth, reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, and lower pulmonary artery pressures. There is no agreed approach on how to best titrate and wean home oxygen treatment in BPD infants. Recent Findings In BPD infants on home oxygen therapy, sleep-disordered breathing is common and appears to be central in origin. However, obstructive apnoea events are also more common in BPD infants. The increased frequency of central apnoea events during sleep in BPD infants has been shown to decline on low-flow oxygen treatment to levels observed in healthy infants. It is hypothesised that brief respiratory pauses in sleep could result in significant oxygen desaturations in BPD infants who have a decreased pulmonary reserve. Those events are scored as central apnoea in polysomnography and are prevented by oxygen treatment. Central apnoea events may also represent disrupted control of breathing secondary to altered chemosensitivity. Summary Polysomnography may

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 10, 2019

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