Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

People-centred Universal Health Coverage in the Asia-Pacific

People-centred Universal Health Coverage in the Asia-Pacific Asian Bioethics Review (2019) 11:1–3 https://doi.org/10.1007/s41649-019-00084-4 EDITORIAL NOTES People-centred Universal Health Coverage in the Asia-Pacific 1 2 Calvin W. L. Ho & Karel Caals Published online: 4 April 2019 National University of Singapore and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019 Universal health coverage (UHC), variedly construed, is not a new concept. In inter- national politics, it emerged as a global health agenda in the 1920s, became marginalised by the 1950s, but re-emerged as BHealth for All^ in the Declaration of Alma-Ata in 1978 (Gorsky and Sirrs 2018). The commitment then was to advance primary health care by linking health with community action, multilateral collaboration and social justice. Since then, health and health-related campaigns such as, for example, the Millennium Development Goals achieved some success, particularly in reducing the maternal mortality and under-five mortality ratios (Cha 2017). UHC remains a prominent goal in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, and for good reasons. Still more needs to be done to improve the global state of primary health care, and its role in promoting the health and wellbeing of people and communities. Alarmingly, essential health services delivered through primary care are inaccessible to half of the world’s population (Primary Health Care http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Bioethics Review Springer Journals

People-centred Universal Health Coverage in the Asia-Pacific

Asian Bioethics Review , Volume 11 (1) – Apr 4, 2019

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-journals/people-centred-universal-health-coverage-in-the-asia-pacific-1IZBi7nnzr
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by National University of Singapore and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
Subject
Philosophy; Bioethics; Ethics; Medical Law; Public Health; Biomedicine, general; Health Administration
ISSN
1793-8759
eISSN
1793-9453
DOI
10.1007/s41649-019-00084-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Asian Bioethics Review (2019) 11:1–3 https://doi.org/10.1007/s41649-019-00084-4 EDITORIAL NOTES People-centred Universal Health Coverage in the Asia-Pacific 1 2 Calvin W. L. Ho & Karel Caals Published online: 4 April 2019 National University of Singapore and Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019 Universal health coverage (UHC), variedly construed, is not a new concept. In inter- national politics, it emerged as a global health agenda in the 1920s, became marginalised by the 1950s, but re-emerged as BHealth for All^ in the Declaration of Alma-Ata in 1978 (Gorsky and Sirrs 2018). The commitment then was to advance primary health care by linking health with community action, multilateral collaboration and social justice. Since then, health and health-related campaigns such as, for example, the Millennium Development Goals achieved some success, particularly in reducing the maternal mortality and under-five mortality ratios (Cha 2017). UHC remains a prominent goal in the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, and for good reasons. Still more needs to be done to improve the global state of primary health care, and its role in promoting the health and wellbeing of people and communities. Alarmingly, essential health services delivered through primary care are inaccessible to half of the world’s population (Primary Health Care

Journal

Asian Bioethics ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Apr 4, 2019

References