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Operational Flexibility of Small-Scale Electricity-Coupled Heat Generating Units

Operational Flexibility of Small-Scale Electricity-Coupled Heat Generating Units Heat generation that is coupled with electricity usage, like combined heat and power generators or heat pumps, can provide operational flexibility to the electricity sector. In order to make use of this in an optimized way, the flexibility that can be provided by such plants needs to be properly quantified. This paper proposes a method for quantifying the flexibility provided through a cluster of such heat generators. It takes into account minimum operational time and minimum down-time of heat generating units. Flexibility is defined here as the time period over which plant operation can be either delayed or forced into operation, thus providing upward or downward regulation to the power system on demand. Results for one case study show that a cluster of several smaller heat generation units does not provide much more delayed operation flexibility than one large unit with the same power, while it more than doubles the forced operation flexibility. Considering minimum operational time and minimum down-time of the units considerably limits the available forced and delayed operation flexibility, especially in the case of one large unit. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Technology and Economics of Smart Grids and Sustainable Energy Springer Journals

Operational Flexibility of Small-Scale Electricity-Coupled Heat Generating Units

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 by Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.
Subject
Energy; Energy Systems; Power Electronics, Electrical Machines and Networks; Energy Policy, Economics and Management
eISSN
2199-4706
DOI
10.1007/s40866-019-0064-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Heat generation that is coupled with electricity usage, like combined heat and power generators or heat pumps, can provide operational flexibility to the electricity sector. In order to make use of this in an optimized way, the flexibility that can be provided by such plants needs to be properly quantified. This paper proposes a method for quantifying the flexibility provided through a cluster of such heat generators. It takes into account minimum operational time and minimum down-time of heat generating units. Flexibility is defined here as the time period over which plant operation can be either delayed or forced into operation, thus providing upward or downward regulation to the power system on demand. Results for one case study show that a cluster of several smaller heat generation units does not provide much more delayed operation flexibility than one large unit with the same power, while it more than doubles the forced operation flexibility. Considering minimum operational time and minimum down-time of the units considerably limits the available forced and delayed operation flexibility, especially in the case of one large unit.

Journal

Technology and Economics of Smart Grids and Sustainable EnergySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 29, 2019

References