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Noise Reduction Based on Training Intervention and Using Visual Signs in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs)

Noise Reduction Based on Training Intervention and Using Visual Signs in Neonatal Intensive Care... Noise may cause hearing damage and delayed growth and development in newborns in neonatal intensive care units. Hence, it is necessary to reduce noise in these environments. Training and use of visual signs have been investigated as the interventional strategies with the aim of reducing noise level and exposure in neonatal intensive care units. This quasi-experimental study (before and after design) was conducted in the NICU of Birjand University of Medical Sciences Hospital (BUMSH NICU). According to ISO9612 standard, equivalent and maximum noise level in the NICU was measured by a calibrated sound level meter TES model 1358C at various stations during different shifts. Subsequently, the training and visual signs (flags and posters) were utilized as the interventions and SPSS version 18 was used for data analysis. The average equivalent and maximum noise level were calculated between 43.5–69.2 and 55.3–79.2 dBA, respectively, which is above the standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Staff conversation, equipment and alarms were among the main sources of noise pollution. The equivalent noise level showed meaningful reduction before and after the interventions (personnel training and visual signs usage) at night. Noise in our NICU was greater than the recommended sound levels of 45 dBA. However, training and visual signs interventions seemed effective in reducing noise levels, particularly during the night shift. Since conversation was identified as the main noise source, future research is recommended to determine personality traits in healthcare professionals and promote a culture of silence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acoustics Australia Springer Journals

Noise Reduction Based on Training Intervention and Using Visual Signs in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs)

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Australian Acoustical Society 2020
ISSN
0814-6039
eISSN
1839-2571
DOI
10.1007/s40857-020-00184-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Noise may cause hearing damage and delayed growth and development in newborns in neonatal intensive care units. Hence, it is necessary to reduce noise in these environments. Training and use of visual signs have been investigated as the interventional strategies with the aim of reducing noise level and exposure in neonatal intensive care units. This quasi-experimental study (before and after design) was conducted in the NICU of Birjand University of Medical Sciences Hospital (BUMSH NICU). According to ISO9612 standard, equivalent and maximum noise level in the NICU was measured by a calibrated sound level meter TES model 1358C at various stations during different shifts. Subsequently, the training and visual signs (flags and posters) were utilized as the interventions and SPSS version 18 was used for data analysis. The average equivalent and maximum noise level were calculated between 43.5–69.2 and 55.3–79.2 dBA, respectively, which is above the standards recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Staff conversation, equipment and alarms were among the main sources of noise pollution. The equivalent noise level showed meaningful reduction before and after the interventions (personnel training and visual signs usage) at night. Noise in our NICU was greater than the recommended sound levels of 45 dBA. However, training and visual signs interventions seemed effective in reducing noise levels, particularly during the night shift. Since conversation was identified as the main noise source, future research is recommended to determine personality traits in healthcare professionals and promote a culture of silence.

Journal

Acoustics AustraliaSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 30, 2020

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