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Network of Influences in an Implementation of a Mathematics Curriculum Innovation

Network of Influences in an Implementation of a Mathematics Curriculum Innovation 114 JULIE SARAMA ET AL. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK The philosophical approach underlying, albeit sometimes nebulously, the national organizations’ reform recommendations, cooperating school’s recently written mission statement, and designers’ innovatory materials, is constructivism. Taking a constructivist perspective, one may accept two major goals for mathematics education (Clements and Battista, 1990; Cobb, 1988): (a) students should develop problem-solving abilities based on rich conceptual knowledge structures, rather than learn to seek out and apply teacher-prescribed methods to complete tasks; and (b) students should become autonomous and self-motivated. Such students would believe mathematics is a way of thinking about problems and their respon- sibility in the mathematics classroom is not so much to complete assigned tasks as to explore, talk about, and learn mathematics. Socially-oriented constructivists emphasize that knowledge is constructed in collaboration with others as “a communal activity, a sharing of the culture” (Bruner, 1986, p. 127). Such a framework is relevant in examining not only how students construct ideas about mathematics but also how teachers construct beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning. Few previous studies on implementations of technology-based educational innovation have used this framework. While not dictating specific teaching strategies (Clements and Battista, 1990; Simon, 1995), individual and social constructivism can http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Technology, Knowledge and Learning" Springer Journals

Network of Influences in an Implementation of a Mathematics Curriculum Innovation

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Education; Learning and Instruction; Mathematics Education; Educational Technology; Science Education; Creativity and Arts Education
ISSN
2211-1662
eISSN
1573-1766
DOI
10.1023/A:1009768005398
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

114 JULIE SARAMA ET AL. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK The philosophical approach underlying, albeit sometimes nebulously, the national organizations’ reform recommendations, cooperating school’s recently written mission statement, and designers’ innovatory materials, is constructivism. Taking a constructivist perspective, one may accept two major goals for mathematics education (Clements and Battista, 1990; Cobb, 1988): (a) students should develop problem-solving abilities based on rich conceptual knowledge structures, rather than learn to seek out and apply teacher-prescribed methods to complete tasks; and (b) students should become autonomous and self-motivated. Such students would believe mathematics is a way of thinking about problems and their respon- sibility in the mathematics classroom is not so much to complete assigned tasks as to explore, talk about, and learn mathematics. Socially-oriented constructivists emphasize that knowledge is constructed in collaboration with others as “a communal activity, a sharing of the culture” (Bruner, 1986, p. 127). Such a framework is relevant in examining not only how students construct ideas about mathematics but also how teachers construct beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning. Few previous studies on implementations of technology-based educational innovation have used this framework. While not dictating specific teaching strategies (Clements and Battista, 1990; Simon, 1995), individual and social constructivism can

Journal

"Technology, Knowledge and Learning"Springer Journals

Published: Oct 5, 2004

References