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More alike than different: the Spanish and Irish labour markets before and after the crisis

More alike than different: the Spanish and Irish labour markets before and after the crisis Spain and Ireland might seem at first to feature very different labour markets, which go from very tight to very flexible labour conditions. Our analysis, however, goes beyond this simplistic argument and brings to light some important similarities. For this purpose, we estimate a dynamic multi-equation structural model for each country and offer two sets of dynamic simulations that account for the swings of the unemployment rates before and after the 2007 crisis. Our results suggest looking beyond the degree of flexibility in both labour markets and focusing instead on other variables usually neglected by more conventional approaches. In particular, such variables as the growth of capital stock, the growth of labour productivity, and demographics, succeed in explaining a great part of the changes in unemployment in both countries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png IZA Journal of European Labor Studies Springer Journals

More alike than different: the Spanish and Irish labour markets before and after the crisis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Agnese and Salvador; licensee Springer.
Subject
Economics / Management Science; Labor Economics; Population Economics
eISSN
2193-9012
DOI
10.1186/2193-9012-1-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spain and Ireland might seem at first to feature very different labour markets, which go from very tight to very flexible labour conditions. Our analysis, however, goes beyond this simplistic argument and brings to light some important similarities. For this purpose, we estimate a dynamic multi-equation structural model for each country and offer two sets of dynamic simulations that account for the swings of the unemployment rates before and after the 2007 crisis. Our results suggest looking beyond the degree of flexibility in both labour markets and focusing instead on other variables usually neglected by more conventional approaches. In particular, such variables as the growth of capital stock, the growth of labour productivity, and demographics, succeed in explaining a great part of the changes in unemployment in both countries.

Journal

IZA Journal of European Labor StudiesSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 31, 2012

References