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Moral cognition and its neural constituents

Moral cognition and its neural constituents Identifying the neural mechanisms of moral cognition is especially difficult. In part, this is because moral cognition taps multiple cognitive sub-processes, being a highly distributed, whole-brain affair. The assumptions required to make progress in identifying the neural constituents of moral cognition might simplify morally salient stimuli to the point that they no longer activate the requisite neural architectures, but the right experiments can overcome this difficulty. The current evidence allows us to draw a tentative conclusion: the moral psychology required by virtue theory is the most neurobiologically plausible. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nature Reviews Neuroscience Springer Journals

Moral cognition and its neural constituents

Nature Reviews Neuroscience , Volume 4 (10) – Oct 1, 2003

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References (46)

Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Nature Publishing Group
Subject
Biomedicine; Biomedicine, general; Neurosciences; Behavioral Sciences; Biological Techniques; Neurobiology; Animal Genetics and Genomics
ISSN
1471-003X
eISSN
1471-0048
DOI
10.1038/nrn1223
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Identifying the neural mechanisms of moral cognition is especially difficult. In part, this is because moral cognition taps multiple cognitive sub-processes, being a highly distributed, whole-brain affair. The assumptions required to make progress in identifying the neural constituents of moral cognition might simplify morally salient stimuli to the point that they no longer activate the requisite neural architectures, but the right experiments can overcome this difficulty. The current evidence allows us to draw a tentative conclusion: the moral psychology required by virtue theory is the most neurobiologically plausible.

Journal

Nature Reviews NeuroscienceSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 2003

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