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Molecular Detection of Human Enteric Adenoviruses in Water Samples Collected from Lake Victoria Waters Along Homa Bay Town, Homa Bay County, Kenya

Molecular Detection of Human Enteric Adenoviruses in Water Samples Collected from Lake Victoria... Lake Victoria is the primary source of water for millions of people in the Sub-Saharan Africa region. In recent years, population development around the lake has resulted in compromised sanitation standards resulting in increased faecal pollution of the lake. Consequently, this condition has increased the chances of waterborne enteric viruses, such as adenoviruses’ circulation in the community. Adenoviruses can affect health in both humans and animals by causing a myriad of diseases including the gastrointestinal infections. The study aimed to detect contamination of the lake water with pathogenic human adenoviruses along Homa Bay town, Homa Bay County, Kenya. To examine the presence of adenoviral genome, we collected a total of 216 (monthly n = 36) water samples from six different locations marked by high levels of anthropogenic activities along the shoreline. Molecular amplification technique using the nested PCR procedure was used to detect the genomes from the water samples. Human adenoviruses were detected in 11 samples (5.09%). Statistical analyses indicated a significant correlation between adenovirus presence and the approximate distance from pit latrines and sewage treatment works at the area. The findings indicate that faecal contamination of the lake waters originated from the point sources. The findings also suggest a possibility of elevated levels of faecal pollution in different surface waters within the lake basin. The findings indicate that some of the enteric viruses circulating in the local community are human adenovirus type 40, and 41. The data may provide a basis for recognizing the need to prioritize environmental monitoring for enteric virus contamination on an on-going basis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food and Environmental Virology Springer Journals

Molecular Detection of Human Enteric Adenoviruses in Water Samples Collected from Lake Victoria Waters Along Homa Bay Town, Homa Bay County, Kenya

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020
ISSN
1867-0334
eISSN
1867-0342
DOI
10.1007/s12560-020-09444-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Lake Victoria is the primary source of water for millions of people in the Sub-Saharan Africa region. In recent years, population development around the lake has resulted in compromised sanitation standards resulting in increased faecal pollution of the lake. Consequently, this condition has increased the chances of waterborne enteric viruses, such as adenoviruses’ circulation in the community. Adenoviruses can affect health in both humans and animals by causing a myriad of diseases including the gastrointestinal infections. The study aimed to detect contamination of the lake water with pathogenic human adenoviruses along Homa Bay town, Homa Bay County, Kenya. To examine the presence of adenoviral genome, we collected a total of 216 (monthly n = 36) water samples from six different locations marked by high levels of anthropogenic activities along the shoreline. Molecular amplification technique using the nested PCR procedure was used to detect the genomes from the water samples. Human adenoviruses were detected in 11 samples (5.09%). Statistical analyses indicated a significant correlation between adenovirus presence and the approximate distance from pit latrines and sewage treatment works at the area. The findings indicate that faecal contamination of the lake waters originated from the point sources. The findings also suggest a possibility of elevated levels of faecal pollution in different surface waters within the lake basin. The findings indicate that some of the enteric viruses circulating in the local community are human adenovirus type 40, and 41. The data may provide a basis for recognizing the need to prioritize environmental monitoring for enteric virus contamination on an on-going basis.

Journal

Food and Environmental VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 3, 2020

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