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Modeling of the kinetic element interaction with biological object

Modeling of the kinetic element interaction with biological object Paper presents a numerical simulation of the process of functioning of a kinetic element and its interaction with a complex target. The simulation was performed in the LS-DYNA environment. The kinetic element is a thin, multi-layered, nylon shell with a thickness of about 0.4 mm. The shell, which is empty in its initial state, fills with air very quickly and expands. When expanding, the shell interacts with the target, which should lead to its neutralization. To simulate the expansion of an air-filled impactor, the method of corpuscular particles was used. In accordance with this method, the impactor inflates under the action of a flow of spherical particles, which are essentially ensembles of many real gas molecules. In this case, the equality of the specific translational kinetic energy of molecules and particles is ensured. The interactions between the particles themselves and the particles and the fabric are perfectly elastic collisions. Targets (bioobjects) are represented using finite element models of anthropometric dummies of the Hybrid III 50th Male type. The data obtained during the simulation were used to evaluate the traumatic effect of the kinetic element according to the viscosity criterion (VC) and to estimate the probability of a target falling. As a result of the calculation, the value of VCmax was determined, which was 0.274 m/s, which corresponds to the absence of traumatic impact. At the same time, the maximum impact pulse was 41.25 N/s, which corresponds to the probability of a fall of 90.5% and 63% for women and men, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and Safety Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2022
ISSN
2509-8004
eISSN
2367-2544
DOI
10.1007/s41314-022-00042-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Paper presents a numerical simulation of the process of functioning of a kinetic element and its interaction with a complex target. The simulation was performed in the LS-DYNA environment. The kinetic element is a thin, multi-layered, nylon shell with a thickness of about 0.4 mm. The shell, which is empty in its initial state, fills with air very quickly and expands. When expanding, the shell interacts with the target, which should lead to its neutralization. To simulate the expansion of an air-filled impactor, the method of corpuscular particles was used. In accordance with this method, the impactor inflates under the action of a flow of spherical particles, which are essentially ensembles of many real gas molecules. In this case, the equality of the specific translational kinetic energy of molecules and particles is ensured. The interactions between the particles themselves and the particles and the fabric are perfectly elastic collisions. Targets (bioobjects) are represented using finite element models of anthropometric dummies of the Hybrid III 50th Male type. The data obtained during the simulation were used to evaluate the traumatic effect of the kinetic element according to the viscosity criterion (VC) and to estimate the probability of a target falling. As a result of the calculation, the value of VCmax was determined, which was 0.274 m/s, which corresponds to the absence of traumatic impact. At the same time, the maximum impact pulse was 41.25 N/s, which corresponds to the probability of a fall of 90.5% and 63% for women and men, respectively.

Journal

Human Factors and Mechanical Engineering for Defense and SafetySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Non-lethal weapons; Numerical simulation; Method of corpuscular particles; Kinetic element; Vicsous criterion; Probability of fall

References