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Mobile Phones in Schools: With or Without you? Comparison of Students’ Anxiety Level and Class Engagement After Regular and Mobile-Free School Days

Mobile Phones in Schools: With or Without you? Comparison of Students’ Anxiety Level and Class... Mobile phones are important for people, especially for young adults and adolescents. As people tend to form attachments to not only social partners, but inanimate targets as well, mobile devices can become important objects that provide safety and security. This could lead to separation anxiety, also known as “nomophobia”. Constant need for mobile use may result in problematic behaviors in schools, cause distraction in class, it is important to explore the students’ relationship to devices. Our study compares state anxiety level of high school students on a regular school day and on an experimental “mobile-free day”, when participants do not carry their mobile phones during classes. We hypothesized that separation from the mobiles would increase anxiety and decrease class engagement, especially in students with higher mobile attachment scores. The sample consisted of 235 secondary school students. Results of Repeated Measures ANCOVA showed that anxiety levels increased on the mobile-free school day, but class engagement was not affected by the experiment. Linear regression analysis revealed ‘Safe Haven’ mobile attachment to be a significant predictor of state anxiety on the mobile free school day. Moreover, correlation analysis revealed that mobile use habits linked to social media and instant message services were associated with higher anxiety scores on the mobile-free school day. Our results provide more insights on both use of mobile phones in learning environment and regarding school regulations of students’ device use. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Technology, Knowledge and Learning" Springer Journals

Mobile Phones in Schools: With or Without you? Comparison of Students’ Anxiety Level and Class Engagement After Regular and Mobile-Free School Days

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V. 2021
ISSN
2211-1662
eISSN
2211-1670
DOI
10.1007/s10758-021-09539-w
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mobile phones are important for people, especially for young adults and adolescents. As people tend to form attachments to not only social partners, but inanimate targets as well, mobile devices can become important objects that provide safety and security. This could lead to separation anxiety, also known as “nomophobia”. Constant need for mobile use may result in problematic behaviors in schools, cause distraction in class, it is important to explore the students’ relationship to devices. Our study compares state anxiety level of high school students on a regular school day and on an experimental “mobile-free day”, when participants do not carry their mobile phones during classes. We hypothesized that separation from the mobiles would increase anxiety and decrease class engagement, especially in students with higher mobile attachment scores. The sample consisted of 235 secondary school students. Results of Repeated Measures ANCOVA showed that anxiety levels increased on the mobile-free school day, but class engagement was not affected by the experiment. Linear regression analysis revealed ‘Safe Haven’ mobile attachment to be a significant predictor of state anxiety on the mobile free school day. Moreover, correlation analysis revealed that mobile use habits linked to social media and instant message services were associated with higher anxiety scores on the mobile-free school day. Our results provide more insights on both use of mobile phones in learning environment and regarding school regulations of students’ device use.

Journal

"Technology, Knowledge and Learning"Springer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2022

Keywords: Mobile phone; Cell phone; Mobile phone attachment; State anxiety; Nomophobia

References