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Longitudinal Neuroimaging Hippocampal Markers for Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease

Longitudinal Neuroimaging Hippocampal Markers for Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease Hippocampal atrophy measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are powerful tools for monitoring Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. In this paper, we introduce a longitudinal image analysis framework based on robust registration and simultaneous hippocampal segmentation and longitudinal marker classification of brain MRI of an arbitrary number of time points. The framework comprises two innovative parts: a longitudinal segmentation and a longitudinal classification step. The results show that both steps of the longitudinal pipeline improved the reliability and the accuracy of the discrimination between clinical groups. We introduce a novel approach to the joint segmentation of the hippocampus across multiple time points; this approach is based on graph cuts of longitudinal MRI scans with constraints on hippocampal atrophy and supported by atlases. Furthermore, we use linear mixed effect (LME) modeling for differential diagnosis between clinical groups. The classifiers are trained from the average residue between the longitudinal marker of the subjects and the LME model. In our experiments, we analyzed MRI-derived longitudinal hippocampal markers from two publicly available datasets (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, ADNI and Minimal Interval Resonance Imaging in Alzheimer’s Disease, MIRIAD). In test/retest reliability experiments, the proposed method yielded lower volume errors and significantly higher dice overlaps than the cross-sectional approach (volume errors: 1.55% vs 0.8%; dice overlaps: 0.945 vs 0.975). To diagnose AD, the discrimination ability of our proposal gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) = $=$ 0.947 for the control vs AD, AUC = $=$ 0.720 for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) vs AD, and AUC = $=$ 0.805 for the control vs MCI. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neuroinformatics Springer Journals

Longitudinal Neuroimaging Hippocampal Markers for Diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease

Neuroinformatics , Volume 17 (1) – May 21, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Bioinformatics; Computational Biology/Bioinformatics; Computer Appl. in Life Sciences; Neurology
ISSN
1539-2791
eISSN
1559-0089
DOI
10.1007/s12021-018-9380-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hippocampal atrophy measures from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are powerful tools for monitoring Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. In this paper, we introduce a longitudinal image analysis framework based on robust registration and simultaneous hippocampal segmentation and longitudinal marker classification of brain MRI of an arbitrary number of time points. The framework comprises two innovative parts: a longitudinal segmentation and a longitudinal classification step. The results show that both steps of the longitudinal pipeline improved the reliability and the accuracy of the discrimination between clinical groups. We introduce a novel approach to the joint segmentation of the hippocampus across multiple time points; this approach is based on graph cuts of longitudinal MRI scans with constraints on hippocampal atrophy and supported by atlases. Furthermore, we use linear mixed effect (LME) modeling for differential diagnosis between clinical groups. The classifiers are trained from the average residue between the longitudinal marker of the subjects and the LME model. In our experiments, we analyzed MRI-derived longitudinal hippocampal markers from two publicly available datasets (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, ADNI and Minimal Interval Resonance Imaging in Alzheimer’s Disease, MIRIAD). In test/retest reliability experiments, the proposed method yielded lower volume errors and significantly higher dice overlaps than the cross-sectional approach (volume errors: 1.55% vs 0.8%; dice overlaps: 0.945 vs 0.975). To diagnose AD, the discrimination ability of our proposal gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) = $=$ 0.947 for the control vs AD, AUC = $=$ 0.720 for mild cognitive impairment (MCI) vs AD, and AUC = $=$ 0.805 for the control vs MCI.

Journal

NeuroinformaticsSpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2018

References