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Limited ripening of low-fat UF-cheese due to CaPO4 barrier?

Limited ripening of low-fat UF-cheese due to CaPO4 barrier? The ripening of industrial soft cheeses manufactured using a liquid pre-cheese produced from the ultrafiltration (UF) of milk was observed to be slow in comparison to that of cheese manufactured by a traditional process. Moreover, in the UF-cheeses investigated in this study, which were produced using Penicillium camemberti as the surface flora, several surface defects were observed: the texture was ‘carton’ like and the rind frequently detached from the cheese. To gain a fuller understanding of the development of these surface defects in UF-cheeses, the migration of different minerals and ions, and the study of the rind microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray mapping were performed. The results suggest that the slower diffusion of lactate, possibly due to the mineral layer at the surface of cheeses, acting as a barrier to its diffusion, may have caused an alteration in the metabolism and growth of the surface mould and may explain the surface defects of these UF-cheeses. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Dairy Science & Technology Springer Journals

Limited ripening of low-fat UF-cheese due to CaPO4 barrier?

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer S+B Media B.V.
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Agriculture; Microbiology
ISSN
1958-5586
eISSN
1958-5594
DOI
10.1051/dst/2009035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The ripening of industrial soft cheeses manufactured using a liquid pre-cheese produced from the ultrafiltration (UF) of milk was observed to be slow in comparison to that of cheese manufactured by a traditional process. Moreover, in the UF-cheeses investigated in this study, which were produced using Penicillium camemberti as the surface flora, several surface defects were observed: the texture was ‘carton’ like and the rind frequently detached from the cheese. To gain a fuller understanding of the development of these surface defects in UF-cheeses, the migration of different minerals and ions, and the study of the rind microstructure by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray mapping were performed. The results suggest that the slower diffusion of lactate, possibly due to the mineral layer at the surface of cheeses, acting as a barrier to its diffusion, may have caused an alteration in the metabolism and growth of the surface mould and may explain the surface defects of these UF-cheeses.

Journal

Dairy Science & TechnologySpringer Journals

Published: May 21, 2011

References