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Jonathan Sklar: Landscapes of the Dark. History, Trauma, Psychoanalysis

Jonathan Sklar: Landscapes of the Dark. History, Trauma, Psychoanalysis BOOK REVIEWS 107 is intriguingly titled “ Anatomy, Desire, Muscles, and Belly. ” Here, Balsam presents a very full account of analytic work to illustrate her proposed theory of non- competing dual gender narratives (p. 124), which she suggests will give us a more open way of listening to the themes of sex and gender and help overcome the male / active female / passive stereotypes that dominate our fi eld. Her fi nal chapter, “ Some Implications for Theory, ” engages with ego psychology, female gender studies, Kleinian and object relations theory, and post-modernism. In doing so, she reveals her familiarity with a broad swath of theoretical orienta- tions, especially as related to her chosen subject. Balsam once remarked (personal communication) that how much or little one says during an analytic hour is less a question of technique and more about one ’ s relationship to language. Some may disagree, but the comment refl ects Balsam ’ s rich, fl uid, alive relationship to language, the language of her patients, and her own deep affi nity for the pleasures of the spoken and written word: poetic, associative, personal, at times focused and forceful, at times lyrical, but always http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Psychoanalysis Springer Journals

Jonathan Sklar: Landscapes of the Dark. History, Trauma, Psychoanalysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Association for the Advancement of Psychoanalysis
Subject
Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Psychotherapy; Psychoanalysis
ISSN
0002-9548
eISSN
1573-6741
DOI
10.1057/ajp.2012.38
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS 107 is intriguingly titled “ Anatomy, Desire, Muscles, and Belly. ” Here, Balsam presents a very full account of analytic work to illustrate her proposed theory of non- competing dual gender narratives (p. 124), which she suggests will give us a more open way of listening to the themes of sex and gender and help overcome the male / active female / passive stereotypes that dominate our fi eld. Her fi nal chapter, “ Some Implications for Theory, ” engages with ego psychology, female gender studies, Kleinian and object relations theory, and post-modernism. In doing so, she reveals her familiarity with a broad swath of theoretical orienta- tions, especially as related to her chosen subject. Balsam once remarked (personal communication) that how much or little one says during an analytic hour is less a question of technique and more about one ’ s relationship to language. Some may disagree, but the comment refl ects Balsam ’ s rich, fl uid, alive relationship to language, the language of her patients, and her own deep affi nity for the pleasures of the spoken and written word: poetic, associative, personal, at times focused and forceful, at times lyrical, but always

Journal

The American Journal of PsychoanalysisSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 8, 2013

References