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“It’s Been a Hard Day’s Night”: Sleep Problems in Caregivers for Older Adults

“It’s Been a Hard Day’s Night”: Sleep Problems in Caregivers for Older Adults Purpose of ReviewThis paper critically evaluates literature from the last 3 years on sleep in caregivers for older adults. Research is evaluated in four main areas: factors related to caregivers having sleep problems, sleep health in various types of caregivers, how caregivers’ sleep and health inter-relate, and interventions to improve sleep.Recent FindingsA range of both care recipients’ and caregivers’ characteristics have been associated with caregiver sleep quality measured subjectively and objectively. Care recipient factors associated with caregiver sleep quality include fall risk and sleep quality, while caregiver factors include stress, duration, intensity, provision of medical/nursing care tasks, and even particular serotonin genotypes (e.g., short-allele carriers for 5-HTTLPR). While the greatest focus has been on dementia caregivers, recent work suggests that groups such as end-of-life caregivers, former caregivers, and caregivers with multiple care roles (e.g., child, older adult, paid care) have sleep disturbances that vary by their unique contexts. Caregiver’s sleep, particularly subjective assessments, relates to their mood and physiological well-being; and evidence suggests that sleep may be an important mediator linking care stressors with mental health. Factors such as mindfulness and sense of coherence may protect caregivers from sleep disturbances.SummarySignificant evidence exists regarding which caregivers are at risk for sleep disturbances and how sleep is associated with health. Caregivers’ appraisals of sleep health were strongly associated with their mental health and well-being. Objective assessments of sleep have been associated with medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Yet more work needs to be done to target the caregiving dyad jointly and help intervene to maintain health over time and prevent declining health. Ultimately, intervening within the unique context of caregiving still presents a challenge of significant public health interest given global population aging. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sleep Medicine Reports Springer Journals

“It’s Been a Hard Day’s Night”: Sleep Problems in Caregivers for Older Adults

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020
eISSN
2198-6401
DOI
10.1007/s40675-020-00164-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of ReviewThis paper critically evaluates literature from the last 3 years on sleep in caregivers for older adults. Research is evaluated in four main areas: factors related to caregivers having sleep problems, sleep health in various types of caregivers, how caregivers’ sleep and health inter-relate, and interventions to improve sleep.Recent FindingsA range of both care recipients’ and caregivers’ characteristics have been associated with caregiver sleep quality measured subjectively and objectively. Care recipient factors associated with caregiver sleep quality include fall risk and sleep quality, while caregiver factors include stress, duration, intensity, provision of medical/nursing care tasks, and even particular serotonin genotypes (e.g., short-allele carriers for 5-HTTLPR). While the greatest focus has been on dementia caregivers, recent work suggests that groups such as end-of-life caregivers, former caregivers, and caregivers with multiple care roles (e.g., child, older adult, paid care) have sleep disturbances that vary by their unique contexts. Caregiver’s sleep, particularly subjective assessments, relates to their mood and physiological well-being; and evidence suggests that sleep may be an important mediator linking care stressors with mental health. Factors such as mindfulness and sense of coherence may protect caregivers from sleep disturbances.SummarySignificant evidence exists regarding which caregivers are at risk for sleep disturbances and how sleep is associated with health. Caregivers’ appraisals of sleep health were strongly associated with their mental health and well-being. Objective assessments of sleep have been associated with medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Yet more work needs to be done to target the caregiving dyad jointly and help intervene to maintain health over time and prevent declining health. Ultimately, intervening within the unique context of caregiving still presents a challenge of significant public health interest given global population aging.

Journal

Current Sleep Medicine ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 1, 2020

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