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Introduction to the special issue: simulation, norms and laws

Introduction to the special issue: simulation, norms and laws Artif Intell Law (2012) 20:335–337 DOI 10.1007/s10506-012-9138-3 Introduction to the special issue: simulation, norms and laws • • Giulia Andrighetto Rosaria Conte Eunate Mayor Villalba Giovanni Sartor Published online: 7 December 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012 Are we satisfied with current approaches to the study of norms? Unfortunately not, as a number of questions are still open. First, a major dichotomy can be observed in the scientific treatment of norms. Theories of norms are grounded on two, unrelated notions, regularities and prescriptions. On the one hand, social scientists view norms as regularities of behaviour, supported by social expectations and possibly enforced through sanctions. On the other hand, philosophers of law and logicians focus on norms as prescriptions issued by definite authorities and enforced though institutional sanctions. Hence, a first set of questions pertaining to the connection between social norms and institutionalised laws comes forth. How can we distinguish normative behaviour (both social and legal) from normal conduct on the one hand and acquiescence under menace on the other? What are commonalities and differences between social conventions and institutional prescriptions? Regularities, or behavioural norms, are spontaneously emerging social phenomena, while, institu- tional prescriptions, are deliberately issued commands. Behavioural norms http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Introduction to the special issue: simulation, norms and laws

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); Legal Aspects of Computing; Philosophy of Law; Computational Linguistics; Law of the Sea, Air and Outer Space
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1007/s10506-012-9138-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artif Intell Law (2012) 20:335–337 DOI 10.1007/s10506-012-9138-3 Introduction to the special issue: simulation, norms and laws • • Giulia Andrighetto Rosaria Conte Eunate Mayor Villalba Giovanni Sartor Published online: 7 December 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2012 Are we satisfied with current approaches to the study of norms? Unfortunately not, as a number of questions are still open. First, a major dichotomy can be observed in the scientific treatment of norms. Theories of norms are grounded on two, unrelated notions, regularities and prescriptions. On the one hand, social scientists view norms as regularities of behaviour, supported by social expectations and possibly enforced through sanctions. On the other hand, philosophers of law and logicians focus on norms as prescriptions issued by definite authorities and enforced though institutional sanctions. Hence, a first set of questions pertaining to the connection between social norms and institutionalised laws comes forth. How can we distinguish normative behaviour (both social and legal) from normal conduct on the one hand and acquiescence under menace on the other? What are commonalities and differences between social conventions and institutional prescriptions? Regularities, or behavioural norms, are spontaneously emerging social phenomena, while, institu- tional prescriptions, are deliberately issued commands. Behavioural norms

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 7, 2012

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