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Introduction to special issue on computational methods for enforcing privacy and fairness in the knowledge society

Introduction to special issue on computational methods for enforcing privacy and fairness in the... Artif Intell Law (2014) 22:109–111 DOI 10.1007/s10506-014-9153-7 Introduction to special issue on computational methods for enforcing privacy and fairness in the knowledge society • • Sergio Mascetti Annarita Ricci Salvatore Ruggieri Published online: 11 February 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 We live in times of unprecedented opportunities for sensing, storing and analyzing micro-data on human activities at extreme detail and resolution, at a societal level. Wireless networks and mobile devices record the traces of our movements. Search engines record the logs of our queries for finding information on the web. Automated payment systems record the tracks of our purchases. Social networking services record our connections to friends, colleagues, and collaborators. Ulti- mately, these big data of human activity are at the heart of the very idea of a knowledge society: a society where decisions—small or big, by business or policy makers—can be taken on the basis of reliable knowledge, distilled from the ubiquitous digital traces generated as a side effect of our living. Increasingly sophisticated intelligent systems support knowledge discovery and deployment from human activity data, enabling the extraction and the (often automatic) use of models, patterns, profiles, and rules of human behavior. This paradigm shift towards the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Artificial Intelligence and Law Springer Journals

Introduction to special issue on computational methods for enforcing privacy and fairness in the knowledge society

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Computer Science; Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics); Legal Aspects of Computing; Philosophy of Law; Computational Linguistics; Law of the Sea, Air and Outer Space
ISSN
0924-8463
eISSN
1572-8382
DOI
10.1007/s10506-014-9153-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Artif Intell Law (2014) 22:109–111 DOI 10.1007/s10506-014-9153-7 Introduction to special issue on computational methods for enforcing privacy and fairness in the knowledge society • • Sergio Mascetti Annarita Ricci Salvatore Ruggieri Published online: 11 February 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014 We live in times of unprecedented opportunities for sensing, storing and analyzing micro-data on human activities at extreme detail and resolution, at a societal level. Wireless networks and mobile devices record the traces of our movements. Search engines record the logs of our queries for finding information on the web. Automated payment systems record the tracks of our purchases. Social networking services record our connections to friends, colleagues, and collaborators. Ulti- mately, these big data of human activity are at the heart of the very idea of a knowledge society: a society where decisions—small or big, by business or policy makers—can be taken on the basis of reliable knowledge, distilled from the ubiquitous digital traces generated as a side effect of our living. Increasingly sophisticated intelligent systems support knowledge discovery and deployment from human activity data, enabling the extraction and the (often automatic) use of models, patterns, profiles, and rules of human behavior. This paradigm shift towards the

Journal

Artificial Intelligence and LawSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 11, 2014

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