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Integrating Yoga in Oncology: Is the wait over?

Integrating Yoga in Oncology: Is the wait over? Indian J Surg Oncol (December 2015) 6(4):325–326 DOI 10.1007/s13193-016-0492-6 LETTER TO THE EDITOR 1 2,3 1 Nagarathna Raghuram & Raghavendra M. Rao & H. R. Nagendra Received: 18 August 2015 /Accepted: 7 January 2016 /Published online: 3 March 2016 Indian Association of Surgical Oncology 2016 Diagnosis and treatment of cancer poses psychological threats making necessary changes in their lives is left to the decision and physical side effects to the patient over their extended hos- of the patient. pital care that grossly affect the patient’s overall functional The use of complementary and alternative therapies quality of life (QOL) [1]. Fear and anxiety coupled with (CAM) used by cancer patients significantly exceeds that of cancer-related intrusive thoughts, age, socio demographic char- the general population. Patients primarily use these CAM ther- acteristics and financial concerns along with a tendency to- apies to enhance the body’s healing ability, to fight cancer wards negativity (neuroticism) may conspire to heighten a more directly, to manage treatment-related side effects, or to women’s risk for psychologic distress which in turn can worsen improve their overall quality of life, including general symp- the treatment related symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, tom management and potential complications. Yoga http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Indian Journal of Surgical Oncology Springer Journals

Integrating Yoga in Oncology: Is the wait over?

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
2016 Indian Association of Surgical Oncology
ISSN
0975-7651
eISSN
0976-6952
DOI
10.1007/s13193-016-0492-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Indian J Surg Oncol (December 2015) 6(4):325–326 DOI 10.1007/s13193-016-0492-6 LETTER TO THE EDITOR 1 2,3 1 Nagarathna Raghuram & Raghavendra M. Rao & H. R. Nagendra Received: 18 August 2015 /Accepted: 7 January 2016 /Published online: 3 March 2016 Indian Association of Surgical Oncology 2016 Diagnosis and treatment of cancer poses psychological threats making necessary changes in their lives is left to the decision and physical side effects to the patient over their extended hos- of the patient. pital care that grossly affect the patient’s overall functional The use of complementary and alternative therapies quality of life (QOL) [1]. Fear and anxiety coupled with (CAM) used by cancer patients significantly exceeds that of cancer-related intrusive thoughts, age, socio demographic char- the general population. Patients primarily use these CAM ther- acteristics and financial concerns along with a tendency to- apies to enhance the body’s healing ability, to fight cancer wards negativity (neuroticism) may conspire to heighten a more directly, to manage treatment-related side effects, or to women’s risk for psychologic distress which in turn can worsen improve their overall quality of life, including general symp- the treatment related symptoms such as nausea and vomiting, tom management and potential complications. Yoga

Journal

Indian Journal of Surgical OncologySpringer Journals

Published: Dec 1, 2015

Keywords: surgical oncology; oncology; surgery

References