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Instructions for Authors

Instructions for Authors INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTERS FOR MATHEMATICAL LEARNING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Richard Noss, Institute of Education, University of London, U.K., e-mail: rnoss@ioe.ac.uk. AIMS AND SCOPE The nature of learning and teaching mathematics has scarcely changed from the days of Euclid. The entry routes to mathematics, the kinds of activity open to a beginner, the kind of teacher-learner and learner-learner interaction available in the classroom, were all shaped by the technology of paper-and-pencil and a pedagogy which relied heavily on lecturing, practising and testing. With the development of innovative computational environments, driven by new visions for teaching and learning mathematics, radically new approaches are emerging. Instead of mastery of rote procedures, students are being actively challenged to investigate rich contextual prob- lems; design, use and refine tools; model and construct mathematical processes and objects; and communicate mathematical ideas in the context of critique and debate. These powerful computational environments are stimulating new thinking about the content of mathematics learning, the way it is assessed, and the kinds of interactive settings in which it can be embedded. And the changes to date might be only intimations of what is to come. But the new visions and computational environments are not in them- selves sufficient http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Technology, Knowledge and Learning" Springer Journals

Instructions for Authors

"Technology, Knowledge and Learning" , Volume 8 (3) – Oct 11, 2004

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Education; Learning and Instruction; Mathematics Education; Educational Technology; Science Education; Creativity and Arts Education
ISSN
2211-1662
eISSN
1573-1766
DOI
10.1023/B:IJCO.0000021983.68223.9f
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF COMPUTERS FOR MATHEMATICAL LEARNING EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Richard Noss, Institute of Education, University of London, U.K., e-mail: rnoss@ioe.ac.uk. AIMS AND SCOPE The nature of learning and teaching mathematics has scarcely changed from the days of Euclid. The entry routes to mathematics, the kinds of activity open to a beginner, the kind of teacher-learner and learner-learner interaction available in the classroom, were all shaped by the technology of paper-and-pencil and a pedagogy which relied heavily on lecturing, practising and testing. With the development of innovative computational environments, driven by new visions for teaching and learning mathematics, radically new approaches are emerging. Instead of mastery of rote procedures, students are being actively challenged to investigate rich contextual prob- lems; design, use and refine tools; model and construct mathematical processes and objects; and communicate mathematical ideas in the context of critique and debate. These powerful computational environments are stimulating new thinking about the content of mathematics learning, the way it is assessed, and the kinds of interactive settings in which it can be embedded. And the changes to date might be only intimations of what is to come. But the new visions and computational environments are not in them- selves sufficient

Journal

"Technology, Knowledge and Learning"Springer Journals

Published: Oct 11, 2004

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